Historical Note

Arrangement

Scope and Content

Restrictions on Access

Restrictions on Use

Acquisition Info

Bibliography

Related Material

Inventory   [ + ]

Subject Terms


Guide to the Congress of Racial Equality, Seattle Chapter Records



Manuscript Collection No.: 1563
Accession No.: 1563-001
Creator: Congress of Racial Equality. Seattle Chapter
Title: Congress of Racial Equality, Seattle Chapter, records
Dates : 1961-1970
Quantity: 5 cubic feet (12 boxes)
Languages: Collection materials are in English.

Funding for encoding this finding aid was partially provided through a grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.



Historical Note

The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was one of the leading non-violent organizations that spearheaded the 1960s civil rights movement. Although it had been in existence in Chicago for two decades, it was not until the early 1960s that the organization became highly visible and reached its peak, establishing local chapters across the country. Seattle CORE became one of the organization’s most ambitious and successful chapters. During the 1960s, Seattle CORE helped support the organization’s national campaigns and undertook many projects to fight local discrimination in employment, housing, and education.

In 1942 a group of Chicago pacifists founded the Congress of Racial Equality. However, the group did not receive much attention until 1960 when four African American students in North Carolina violated segregation practices by sitting at a Woolworth’s lunch counter. Realizing that the demonstrators had used the non-violent methods that CORE advocated, the organization rushed to assist them after their arrest. CORE was not responsible for this event, but the protest brought widespread publicity and showed the effectiveness that non-violent direct action could have.

The following year was even more pivotal for the organization when it organized the Freedom Rides. Despite the publicity that CORE gained from the Woolworth sit-in, the following year proved to be more momentous and led people in cities such as Seattle to open local chapters. Following a Supreme Court decision prohibiting segregation in interstate travel, including on buses and in terminal accommodations, CORE organized groups of African Americans to ride buses throughout the South and violate customary segregation wherever they went.

After its founding in 1961, most of Seattle CORE’s initial work was to support CORE’s national efforts, especially the campaigns in the South. One example was in 1961 when Seattle CORE teamed up with the local National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to support the Haywood County Civic and Welfare League. This action was to raise money for black sharecroppers and tenant farmers near Brownsville, Tennessee, who had been evicted for registering to vote.

Soon, however, the chapter began to focus on local discrimination. The chapter’s first target was employment discrimination, and in October 1961 it began its campaign against the Bon Marché department store. By 1962 protests spread to J.C. Penney, Nordstrom, Frederick & Nelson, A&P, Tradewell, and Washington Natural Gas. Protest methods included a “selective buying” campaign, picketing, and other demonstrations. One of the largest protests came in 1963 when Seattle CORE and the local NAACP led 1,000 marchers to the Bon Marché. At department stores the chapter also led “shoe-ins.” During these events CORE flooded the stores with protesters who tried on numerous pairs of shoes without buying any of them. Seattle CORE also picketed A&P grocery stores for fifteen weeks in 1963 until reaching an agreement with management. However, by March 1964 the chapter said that the company had not lived up to its agreement and began protesting again. For the first time, Seattle CORE used the “shop-in,” in which protesters filled their carts with non-perishable goods and rang them up at the cash register, then left without buying the items.

By 1964 the chapter’s actions had convinced management to agree to start hiring more African Americans at Bon Marché, Safeway, J.C. Penney, A&P, Wonder Bread, Frederick & Nelson, Nordstrom, and other stores. By the end of 1964, Seattle CORE claimed that its actions had resulted in the hiring of more than 250 white-collar employees. In terms of the number of jobs opened to African Americans, Seattle CORE was one of the most successful chapters in the nation.

Despite initial jubilation, many Seattle CORE members began to see their gains as minor compared to the employment discrimination that still existed. Thus the chapter began Operation DEEDS (Drive for Equal Employment in Downtown Stores), one of the most ambitious programs ever undertaken by a CORE chapter. DEEDS was a boycott of the entire downtown shopping area in October 1964, with a demand for 1,200 jobs for African Americans. Members quickly became frustrated when they were unable to obtain their ambitious goal, even though the results of this project compared favorably with previous campaigns.

Housing discrimination was another target of the chapter. Late in 1963, Seattle CORE conducted “Operation Windowshop” which encouraged blacks to look for housing outside the Central District. On designated weekends, CORE encouraged African Americans to visit realtors and attend open houses to try to move into white neighborhoods. However, many homeowners and members of the real estate industry were adamantly opposed to housing integration. As a result, many “for sale” signs came down and many realtors closed their businesses on Operation Windowshop weekends. Seattle CORE then lobbied the city council to pass an open-housing ordinance. When that effort failed, it tried to pass an open-housing referendum in 1964, which the local realtors’ association fought vigorously. Seattle voters soundly rejected the measure in eleven of twelve voting districts.

Following the defeat of the open-housing ordinance, Seattle CORE turned to direct action protests to fight housing segregation. In March 1964, it began sit-ins at the Picture Floor Plans Company, one of the local real estate firms accused of discouraging African Americans from buying homes in white neighborhoods. This protest signaled a change in the actions of the chapter’s membership in a way that seemed out-of-line with CORE’s rules of conduct. For the first time, many CORE protesters chanted and sang, shouted insults, and pushed and shoved when a locked door was opened to admit a customer. When a salesperson grew hostile and struck a demonstrator, the chapter suspended the protests. The next day a court injunction halted all picketing against realtors.

The actions of protesters at the Picture Floor Plans Company demonstrated the internal divisions that were taking shape within Seattle CORE as well as the national organization itself. Like other local chapters, Seattle CORE maintained a relatively small membership, which was partly by design. Seattle CORE had a “closed membership” policy which meant that people could only receive active memberships after serving a probationary period, participating in action projects, receiving approval from two-thirds of the chapter, and committing themselves to following the CORE rules of conduct. As a result of such stringent requirements, the membership of Seattle CORE usually remained below fifty. One of the reasons that CORE remained so effective was that its sympathizers, who contributed money and participated in demonstrations, outnumbered active members of the chapter. However, with each successive victory more people wanted to join the ranks of the organization and the chapter grew in size through 1964. Some members complained about this growth, arguing that the organization was getting too large and that it was becoming too easy for people to join. The rise of Black Power ideology by 1965 influenced many younger members of the chapter, who believed more fervently in retaliation than in non-violent resistance, and who were less willing to accept white integration in the organization.

Dissidents within CORE, who more readily accepted Black Power, formed themselves into the Ad Hoc Committee and even rented their own office. They were the ones who had inaugurated the confrontations at the Picture Floor Plans Company and had allegedly escalated confrontation at the A&P shop-in. Members of the Ad Hoc Committee accused the chapter leaders of being “too respectable” and not militant enough. When the chapter called off the Picture Floor Plans Company protests, dissident members tried to defeat the leadership in the next election. After failing, members of the committee withdrew from CORE and planned to function as a ghetto-oriented institution, but soon disintegrated. However, their departure did not end the chapter’s internal problems, as many members began leaving the organization. By 1965 Seattle CORE had a membership of only 65, compared to over 200 the year before.

Seattle CORE faced the same problems that were confronting the national organization and chapters across the country. While African Americans held most of the top leadership positions, CORE had always been a multiracial organization. In Seattle and in many other cities with a relatively small black population, it was not uncommon for the membership to include more whites than blacks. Although this issue was not the major one that split Seattle CORE in the mid 1960s, it did become a factor after the 1967 national CORE convention which deleted the word “multiracial” from its constitution. Seattle chairperson John Cornethan publicly criticized this action and declared that it was an effort to drive out white supporters. Dissidents Frances White and Les McIntosh seized on this opportunity to oust Cornethan from his post and then made Seattle CORE the city’s first civil rights group to embrace Black Power. After this event, most whites disappeared from the organization, which continued its decline until its end in 1970.

Despite internal rifts, Seattle CORE managed to continue anti-discrimination campaigns until the late 1960s. In the summer of 1965, it started running “Freedom Patrols” to follow police officers and monitor their behavior. In the spring of 1966 it led a two-day boycott of Seattle public schools to protest de facto segregation of schoolchildren. In the same year it also protested discrimination by labor unions, particularly the Building Trades Union which represented construction workers.

Arrangement

Arranged in 5 series:

  • Organizational records
  • Civil rights literature
  • Conventions and workshops
  • Subject files
  • Miscellaneous oversize

Scope and Content

Most of the materials relate to Seattle CORE’s activities, both in local and national civil rights campaigns. The records include correspondence, minutes, financial records, committee records, convention and workshop materials, and subject files regarding the national and local civil rights movement. Subject files include material on housing, education, employment (including case files), and civil rights projects in various Southern states. The collection also includes civil rights literature from Seattle CORE, national CORE, and other sources.

The Ad Hoc Committee folder in box 3 contains information from the chapter’s established leadership about the dissident Ad Hoc Committee. This container also contains a detailed description of the investigation of discrimination at the Picture Floor Plans Company and subsequent protests against the firm, as well as complaints about committee members who allegedly did not adhere to CORE rules during the demonstrations.

In box 3, the Negotiating Committee folder provides the African American employment statistics for each of the stores that Seattle CORE accused of discrimination. Case files in boxes 7 and 8 contain Seattle CORE materials related to their investigations, negotiations with, and protests against specific companies.

Restrictions on Access

The records are open to all users.

Restrictions on Use

The creators' literary rights have been transferred to the University of Washington Libraries.

Acquisition Info

Gift of the Congress on Racial Equality, Seattle Chapter, via Mrs. Frances White in 1971.

Bibliography

August Meier and Elliott Rudwick, CORE: A Study in the Civil Rights Movement, 1942-1968 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1973).

Quintard Taylor, The Forging of a Black Community: Seattle’s Central District from 1870 through the Civil Rights Era (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1994).

Larry S. Richardson, “Civil Rights in Seattle: A Rhetorical Analysis of a Social Movement” (Ph.D. dissertation, Washington State University, 1975).

Inge Powell Bell, CORE and the Strategy of Nonviolence (New York: Random House, 1968).

Doris Pieroth, “With All Deliberate Caution: School Integration in Seattle, 1954-1968,” Pacific Northwest Quarterly 73:2 (April 1982).

Related Material

The State Historical Society of Wisconsin holds the records from the CORE national office, the Western Regional Office, the Southern Regional Office, and the archives of the Scholarship, Education and Defense Fund for Racial Equality. All but the papers of the national office are available on microfilm, and the University of Washington Libraries’ Microforms and Newspapers division has a copy of the Western Regional Office records as well as a guide to the society’s entire CORE collection. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center in Atlanta, the Bancroft Library at the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of Michigan also hold CORE records.

The Special Collections division in the University of Washington Libraries holds three Seattle CORE publications, including two studies by Charles Valentine regarding segregation in public schools and Operation DEEDS.


Inventory

  
BoxDate
Organizational records
Processing Info: All listings are in one folder each unless otherwise specified.
1Constitutionundated
1Organizational materialsundated
Correspondence
1General correspondence1961-1968
7 folders
1American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) correspondence1965-1966
1Human Rights Commission, bulletins1964-1965
Washington State Board Against Discrimination
1Correspondence1961-1962
1Restaurant figuresundated
1Notices, reports, miscellaneousundated
1Miscellaneousundated
2Minutes1963-1966
2Financial records1966
General Notes: see also: oversize box 12: 3 ledgers, 1 cash book
2Reportsundated
Lists
7 folders
2Attendanceundated
Scope and Content: General meetings and orientation meetings.
2Book listsundated
2Civic organizations and churchesundated
2Mailing listsundated
2Membership listsundated
General Notes: see also: oversize box 12: membership file cards
2Pledge listsundated
2News releasesundated
2Notesundated
2Newsletter -- The CORElator 1961-1968
2Clippingsundated
3 folders
2Photographsundated
2Ephemeraundated
Miscellaneous
3Fire inspection requirements for officeundated
3Officers and elections1964-1965
3Maps of Central Areaundated
3Record of office phone callsundated
3Telephone answering service dataundated
Committees
3Ad Hoc Committee -- Congress of Racial Equality factionundated
3Complaints Committee -- miscellaneous discrimination complaintsundated
3Negotiations Committeeundated
3Sign Making Committeeundated
3Speakers Bureauundated
3Miscellaneous committeesundated

  
BoxDate
Civil rights literature -- Congress of Racial Equality, Seattle
3"Freedom Songs"undated
3"Labor Unions"1966 November 9
3"Race Relations Exam"undated
3"Seattle CORE"undated
3"Some General Goals and Principles of CORE"undated
3"Talk, Talk, Talk"undated
3Unauthorized leafletundated
3"We Need You"undated
3"What is CORE?"undated
3"Why Legislation?"undated
3"You Can Help"undated

  
BoxDate
Conventions and workshops
3National Congress of Racial Equality Convention1963
3Seattle Congress of Racial Equality workshop1963
3California Congress of Racial Equality Conference1964
3Seattle Congress of Racial Equality Retreat1964
3National Congress of Racial Equality Convention1964
3Regional Congress of Racial Equality Convention1964
3Seattle Congress of Racial Equality Office Open House1965
3National Congress of Racial Equality Convention1965
3Seattle Congress of Racial Equality Retreat1966
3National Congress of Racial Equality Convention1967

  
BoxDate
Subject files
Alabama-Selma
4Sign-up sheetundated
4Telegram suggestionsundated
Baldwin (James) Benefit
4Outgoing correspondence1963
4Financial records1963
4Clippings1963
4Ephemera1963
Bush, George Washington
4Incoming correspondence1967-1970
4Outgoing correspondence1967-1970
4News releases, notes, clippings, photographs1967-1970
4Ephemera1967-1970
4Central Area Coordinating Committee for Civil Rights--registration formsundated
Civil rights literature -- other organizations
19 folders
4 The Advance, Brotherhood Week1963 February 17-24
4 The Afro-American Journal 1968 January, February, April
American Friends Service Committee
4King, Martin Luther, Jr., "Letter From Birmingham Jail"1963
4 The Northwesterner.1964 February
4Rustin, Bayard, "Non-Violence and the Harlem Riots"1964
4Statement of Support of the August 28 March on Washingtonundated
4Miscellaneousundated
Anti-Defamation League of the B'nai B'rith
4The Anti-Defamation League of the B'nai B'rith1963
4Review of the 88th Congress1964
4Baptists, Clyde Hill Baptist Church, "The Church and Race"1964
4Baptists, Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Zionews.1966 October 9
4Berrigan, (Father) Philip, "WAR -- Wrong Approach to Righteousness"1965
4California Fair Employment Practices Commission, Fair Practices News 1964 March, June
4Central Area Committee on Civil Rights, announcementundated
4Central Area Community Council, Statement of Purpose and Programundated
Central Area Motivation Program (CAMP)
4General report1965-1967
4Newsletterundated
4 Trumpet 1967-1968
4Chamber of Commerce, Seattle, Junior, Resolution1963
Christian Friends for Racial Equality
4Statement of Purposeundated
4 Racial Equality Bulletin.1962 April, 1963 May
4Christian Social Action Committee, Newsletter1963 October
4Council of Churches, Seattle, Memo to Ministersundated
Civil Rights Action Group (CRAG)
4"Historical and Social Context of the Civil Rights Movement"1964
4"Purpose of CRAG"undated
Civic Unity Committee
4 Fair Play 1963 June
4"Fair Play in Our Cosmopolitan Seattle"undated
4"The Housing Situation of Minority Groups in the State of Washington" 1961
4Statement (John F. Gordon)undated
4Miscellaneousundated
4Committee of Women for Freedom Now, miscellaneousundated
4Convention Center, New Politics News.1968
4Council for Civic Unity (San Francisco), "Property Values and Race"1960
4Council of Federated Organizations (COFO), excerpts regarding the Mississippi Projectundated
4 Current, "Federal Action for Civil Rights"undated
4Democratic Party, King County Democratic Central Committee, Resolution1963
4East Side Conference on Religion and Race, Workshop Program1963
4Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, Rights 1966
4Episcopalians, The National Council, "The Church Speaks on Race"undated
Fellowship of Reconciliation
4"Freedom, the South, and Non-violence"undated
4"The Struggle for Racial Equality"1956
4King, Martin Luther, Jr., "Facing the Challenge of a New Age"undated
4Smith, Lillian, "The Right Way is Not a Moderate Way"undated
4"Unwise and Untimely?," a letter from eight Alabama clergymen to Martin Luther King, Jr., and his reply1963
4 Fortune, editorial - "There Isn't Sny Time"1964 July
4Friends of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee Newsletter1967 July 15
4Fund for Public Information: Hall, Gus, "Negro Freedom"1964 July
4Getz, William, "The Equal Rights Movement in Seattle"1964
4Hearde, Oscar, "Inter-Marriage," "To All Christians and Especially of the Pentacostal Faith"undated
Hillman (Sidney) Foundation
4MacDonald, Dwight, "Our Invisible Poor"1963
4Human Rights Commission, Seattle, Proposed Open Housing Ordinanceundated
4King County Library System, "Civil Rights --It's Our Problem, Too"undated
4League of Women Voters of Seattle, press releasecirca 1965
4 Liberation.1963 October
4May Valley (Washington) Co-op Community, Statement of Aimsundated
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
4 The Crisis 1964 February
4Current, Gloster B., "Understanding NAACP Policy"undated
Newsletter
41961 September 1961 September
4 1962 January 1962 January
41962 March 1962 March
41963 November 1963 November
41963 December 1963 December
41964 June 1964 June
41964 August 1964 August
41964 September 1964 September
4 1964 November 1964 November
41964 December 1964 December
4Ovington, Mary White, "How the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Began"1919
4"What's Your NAACP Been Doing"1963 July
4Wilkins, Roy, "Humiliation Stalks Them" 1963 July
National Conference on Religion and Race
4"An Appeal to the Conscience of the American People"1963 January
4Reston, James, "The First Significant Test of the Freedom March" ( NewYork Times reprint1963 August 30
4National Sharecroppers Fund, "The Condition of Farm Workers and Small Farmers in 1965"circa 1965
4Northwood, L.K., "A Housing Fact Sheet"1962
4Parent Youth Camp, Employment Announcement1966
4Peace News Pamphlets (London), Henry David Thoreau, "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience"1963
4Rich, Marvin, "Civil Rights Strategy after the March" ( New Politics reprint)1963
4The Congress of Racial Equality and Its Strategy ( Annals of American Academy of Political and Social Sciences reprint)1965
4Rosen, Ellsworth E., "When A Negro Moves Next Door" ( Saturday Evening Post reprint) 1959 April
4Seattle Citizens Against Goldwater, "Why Not Goldwater?"1968
Seattle Conference on Religion and Race1963 June 5
4Literature display1963 June 5
4Statement on the proper role of the clergy1963 June 5
4Seattle Women for Peace, announcement of Frank Wilkinson lecture 1963 November 20
4Socialist Party, New America 1963 August 31
Southern Christian Leadership Conference
4Newsletter 1963 October
4Some Important Fiscal Facts about Southern Christian Leadership Conferenceundated
4Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, The Student Voice.1963 December 30
United Church of Christ
4"Samples of Congregational Involvement"undated
4"Shall We Still Betray Our Lord?"1963 September 3
4United Nations, "Universal Declaration of Human Rights"1948
Urban League, Boston
4McPherson, J. Westbrook, "A Change of Heart on Picketing" 1963 October 31
Urban League, National
4"The Urban League Role: Unique and Crucial"1964
Urban League, Seattle
4Annual reports1961, 1962
4"Better Schools for a Better Tomorrow"undated
4"Doors are Opening"1963
4"Ed Pratt-- Dedicated Urban League Director" ( Argus reprint)1965 April 30
4Finley, Otis E., Jr., "Discrimination"1963
4"In Pursuit of Equal Opportunity"1963
4Memorandum regarding Central Area schools1963 September 4
4Memorandum regarding school transfers1963 September 27
4Newsletter1962 October, 1963 January-October, 1965 July
4"Progress in Race Relations"1966 January 2
4"Seattle Urban League Prepares for Future"1966 April 15
4"Social Welfare Agencies and the Negro"undated
4War Resisters League, "What Is the War Resisters League?"1964
4Washington Citizens Committee for Civil Rights Legislation, Newsletter1962 December 15
4World Without War Conference, letter 1963 September 20
Education
5Incoming correspondence1965-1966
5Outgoing correspondence1962-1966
5Minutes1966
5Reportsundated
5News releasesundated
5Notesundated
5Clippingsundated
5Ephemeraundated
5Miscellaneous undated
Scope and Content: NAACP-CORE - Transfer plan pledge cards.
5Freedom School
General Notes: see also: oversize box 12 - card file of Freedom School participants
5Incoming correspondence1966
5Outgoing correspondence1966
5Minutes1966
5Financial records1966
5Reports1966
5Notes1966
5Clippings1966
5Ephemera1966
5Miscellaneous programs and participants1966
Negro history class
6Class materials1966-1967
6Student work1966-1967
6Home visits regarding education1965
6Interview area assignments1965
6Evaluation sheets1965
Employment
Incoming correspondence
6California Fair Employment Practices Division1964, undated
6Chamber of Commerce, Seattle1965
6United States Army1964
6United States Coast Guard1964
6United States General Services Administration1965
6Outgoing correspondence1962-1964, undated
6Reportsundated
6News releasesundated
6Notesundated
6Clippingsundated
6Ephemeraundated
6Miscellaneous applications for employmentundated
DEEDS (Drive for Equal Employment in Downtown Seattle)
6Incoming correspondence1964-1965
6Outgoing correspondence1964
6Reportsundated
6Notesundated
6Clippingsundated
6Ephemeraundated
Miscellaneous
7Information from neighborhood meetingsundated
7 Employment recordsundated
7Returned employment couponsundated
7 Drive for Equal Employment in Downtown Seattle pledge cardsundated
7Restaurant fileundated
Scope and Content: Principal correspondent: Washington State Restaurant Association.
General Notes: see also: Case files--Clark's Restaurant Enterprises; Mannings Coffee Cafes
Case files
A & P Tea Company
7Incoming correspondence 1963 September-1964 October
7Outgoing correspondence 1962 October-1964 July, undated
7Minutesundated
7Reportsundated
7Listsundated
7News releasesundated
7Notesundated
7Clippingsundated
7Ephemeraundated
7Albertson's Food Store1962 January
7Bartell's surveyundated
Bon Marché
9 folders
7Incoming correspondence1963 June-October
7Outgoing correspondence1963 May-1964 February
7Minutesundated
7Reportsundated
7Listsundated
7News releasesundated
7Clippingsundated
7Ephemeraundated
7Carnation Company1964 June-August
7Clark's Restaurant Enterprises, Inc.
7Outgoing correspondence1966
7Minutes1966
7Reportsundated
7Reports - surveyundated
7Notesundated
7Ephemeraundated
7Crown Zellerbach Corporation1965 February
7Darigold (Consolidated Dairy Products)1963-1964
8Fisher Flouring Mills1965
8Frederick & Nelson1963
8Greyhound Bus Lines1964
8Lucky Grocery Stores1962-1963
8Mannings Coffee Cafes1966
8Nordstrom-Best
8Incoming correspondence1964-1965
8Outgoing correspondence1964
8Minutesundated
8Reportsundated
8Listsundated
8News releasesundated
8Notesundated
8Clippingsundated
8Pay 'n' Save Corporation1965
8J.C. Penny Company, Inc.1962-1963
8Rainier Brewery1965
8Rhodes of Seattle1962
8Safeway Stores, Inc1961-1963
8Incoming correspondence1963-1964
Outgoing correspondence1961-1963
8Minutes, reports, lists, notes, clippings, ephemera
8Seattle Police Departmentundated
8 Seattle Observer undated
Taxi survey
8Incoming correspondence1963-1965
8Outgoing correspondence1963-1964
8Reportsundated
8Notesundated
8Clippingsundated
8Ephemeraundated
8Thriftway Stores, Inc.1962
Tradewell Stores, Inc.
7 folders
8Incoming correspondence1962-1965
8Outgoing correspondence1962-1964
8Minutes1961-1964
8Lists and news releasesundated
8Notesundated
8Clippings and ephemeraundated
8United Air Linesundated
Washington Natural Gas Company
8Incoming correspondence1964
8Outgoing correspondence1964
Minutes1963-1964
8News releasesundated
8Notes, clippings, ephemeraundated
8Western International Hotelsundated
8Miscellaneous discrimination complaintsundated
Farmer, James1965
2 folders
8Outgoing correspondence1965
8Financial recordsundated
8Clippingsundated
8Ephemeraundated
8Miscellaneous - reservation lists and cardsundated
Freedom Patrols
8Memoundated
Reports
8American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)undated
8Citizens' Committee on Police Practicesundated
8Morris, Arval, "Constitutional Controls over Criminal Procedure"undated
8Clippingsundated
8Miscellaneousundated
Housing
9Incoming correspondence1963-1964
Scope and Content: Major correspondent: Harmony Homes, Inc.
9Outgoing correspondence1963-1965
9Reportsundated
9Reports - other organizationsundated
9News releasesundated
9Legislationundated
9Notesundated
9Clippingsundated
9Ephemeraundated
9City Hall demonstration--clippings1963
Fair Housing Listing Service
9Newsletters1963-1965
9Ephemeraundated
9Injunction--real estate board case1965
Operation Window Shop1963
2 folders
9Outgoing correspondence1963
9Reports1963
9News releases1963
9Legislation1963
9Notes1963
9Clippings1963
9Ephemera1963
Picture Floor Plan Demonstration
9Report1964
9Clippings1964
9Ephemera1964
9Rent strike1964
9Miscellaneous discrimination complaintsundated
Mississippi
6 folders
9Adopt-A-Civil-Rights-Worker Project1964
9Freedom Democratic Party1964-1965
9Liberty House1966-1969
9Incoming correspondence1966-1969
9Outgoing correspondence1966-1969
9Notes1966-1969
9Order1966-1969
9Ephemera1966-1969
9Newsletters from John Fawcett1965
9Mississippi Summer Program1964
Scope and Content: Principal correspondent: COFO (Council of Federated Organizations).
9Petitions regarding Mississippi1964
National Congress of Racial Equality and other Congress of Racial Equality offices
10 folders
National Congress of Racial Equality
10Correspondence1961-1969, undated
9 folders
10Minutes1962-1968
10Reportsundated
10Newsletter - National CORELator 1961-1965
Civil rights literature
10"All About CORE"undated
10Barry, Joseph, "On Going to Jail" ( New York Post reprint)1961 September 20
10"Breaking the Noose"undated
10Buckley, Helen, "The CORE Way" ( Survey Graphic reprint)1946 February
10Calendar of Coercion1964
10Christmas cards1962-1966
10"Columbia Class Stresses Protest" ( New York Times reprint)1967 February 20
10"McKissick Opens Training Center" ( The Sun, Baltimore, reprint)1966 December 6
10"Cracking the Color Line"undated
10"Equality Is Goal of Race Congress" ( New York Times reprint)1960 February
10Farmer, James, "Louisiana Story"1963
10Fresh Air Fling Announcement1964
10"Have You Ever Started a Fad?"undated
10"Haywood Handicrafters"undated
10"Here We Stand" (regarding Black Power)undated
10"Holiday Gift Suggestions"undated
10"Introduction to a Sit-in" ( LOOK reprint)1961 January 3
10Johns, Major and Moore, Ronnie, "It Happened in Baton Rouge, U.S.A."1962
10"Justice?" (regarding committee of inquiry into the administration of justice in the freedom struggle)1962
10Kempton, Murray, "The Trial" ( New York Post reprint)1962 March 21
10McCain, James T., "The Right to Vote"1962
McKissick, Floyd B.
10"A Black Manifesto"circa 1966
10"Constructive Militancy"1966
10"Genocide, U.S.A."1967
10"Is Integration Necessary?" ( The New Republic reprint)1966 December 3
10March on Washington album announcement1963
10Memorial service (Chaney-Goodman-Schwerner) announcement1964
10 The Movement 1965
10"Position of the Congress of Racial Equality on the War in Vietnam"undated
10"Rules for Action"1961
10"Something New - Freedom Schools"undated
10"A Strong Civil Rights Bill by Christmas"1963
10"Summer Training Programs in NON-Violence"1962
10Support Black Power stickerundated
10"Target City Project, 1966 - A Beginning"circa 1966
10"This Is CORE"1962
10Wechsler, James A., "The Recruit" ( New York Post reprint)1962 December 3
10"What Do Black People Know about the War in Viet Nam?"1964?
10"What Is a CORE Community Center?"undated
10"What Is CORE Doing Now?"1966 October
10"Where Is Democracy?"undated
10"Your Invitation to Join CORE"undated
Western Regional Field Office
11Memos and newsletters1962-1966
11Miscellaneous mailings1963-1966
11Southern Regional Core: correspondence (mailings)1965
11Other chapters: newslettersundated
North Carolina--Monroe
Incoming correspondence
11Committee to Aid the Monroe Defendants1962
11NAACP1962
11News releases1962
11Ephemera1962
Police brutality
11Incoming correspondence1964-1966
11Outgoing correspondenceundated
11Reportsundated
11Resolutionsundated
11Clippingsundated
11Ephemeraundated
11Miscellaneous complaintsundated

  
BoxDate
Miscellaneous oversize items
12Financial records    OVERSIZEundated
3 ledgers
12Financial records    OVERSIZEundated
1 cash book
12Lists--membership file cards    OVERSIZEundated
2 boxes
12Education--Freedom School participants file cards    OVERSIZEundated
1 box

Subject Terms

Personal Names:
Baldwin, James, 1924-1987.
Bush, George Washington, fl. 1845.
Farmer, James, 1920-
Organizations:
American Civil Liberties Union.
Congress of Racial Equality.
Congress of Racial Equality. Seattle Chapter--Archives.
Washington State Board Against Discrimination.
Geographic Names:
Seattle (Wash.)--Politics and government.
Seattle (Wash.)--Race relations.
Southern states--Race relations.
Subjects:
African Americans--Civil rights--Washington (State)--Seattle.
African Americans--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Civil rights demonstrations--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Civil rights movements--United States.
Civil rights workers, Black--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Civil rights workers--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Civil rights--Southern states.
Civil rights--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Civil rights--Washington (State)--Seattle--Societies, etc.
Civil rightsUnited States--Societies, etc.
Discrimination in employment--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Race discrimination--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Race--Religious aspects.
Right to education--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Right to housing--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Right to labor--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Genre Headings:
Clippings (Books, newspapers, etc.)
Lists.
Newsletters.
Press releases.
Publications.
articles.
case files.
conferences.
correspondence.
ephemera.
financial records.
minutes.
notes.
reports.
Last modified: February 16, 2013
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