Historical Note

Historical Background

Scope and Content

Digital Content

Restrictions on Access

Processing Info

Inventory

Subject Terms


Guide to the Helping the Homeless Man Photograph Collection
ca. 1933-1934



VM Collection No.: 608
Title: Helping the Homeless Man: Activities and Facilities of the Central Registry for Homeless Single Men
Date Span: ca. 1933-1934
Quantity: 18 photographic prints (1 box)
Location: K0184
Languages: Collection materials are in English.
Double-deck beds, each with a 20-lb. felt mattress, 2 white sheets, and a 4-lb. wool blanket. Special Collections, UW Libraries, UW22183z

Funding for encoding this finding aid was partially provided through a grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.



Historical Note

The Seattle Salvation Army was founded in 1887 and during the Depression operated shelters for homeless men at 213 ½ Second Avenue South, the former United States Immigration Building, and at 117 ½ Main Street. Because of Seattle's position as a gateway city to the Pacific and Alaska, the men who visited the shelters came from all over the United States and even from foreign nations.

Historical Background

During the early 1930s, while the United States endured the Great Depression, many people became homeless. Some government agencies and private charities tried to help the homeless by providing food, shelter, and employment. These shelters were known by several names such as emergency shelters, flophouses, Hoover's hotels, and recreation halls.

When men entered the shelters, they were registered, fed, cleaned and examined, and provided with clean nightclothes and a bed for the night. If the men needed medical attention, they were sent to a hospital. In the morning, their newly fumigated and sterilized clothes were returned. They were served breakfast and either sent on their way or asked to do some work in the shelter. Sometimes a shelter had an employment agency that located jobs for the men.

Scope and Content

The photographs in this collection show three of the shelters that were set up by the Salvation Army to help the homeless men in Seattle during the Great Depression. Interior views of the shelters show double-deck beds, the shower facilities, and some of the areas in the shelters where the men could find employment, such as a tailor shop, a shoe repair shop, and a wood yard operation.

Digital Content

View selections from the collection in digital format.

Restrictions on Access

Collection is open to the public.

Processing Info

Processed by Maria Ovalles and Jocelyn Spicer, 2002.

Condition Note: Because the album had come apart, the album pages were separated and put into protective folders.


Inventory

 
Folder Item
11Title page: Helping the Homeless Man, Activities and Facilities of the Central Registry for Homeless Single Men
 
2-3Shelter #1, 213 1/2 Second Avenue South, Seattle   View image
 
4-5Shelter #2, formerly the United States Immigration Bldg., Seattle   View image
 
6-7Shelter #3, 117 1/2 Main Street, Seattle   View image
 
8-9Shelter #2, dormitory   View image
 
10-11Double-deck beds
 
12-13Wood yard at Railroad Avenue and King Street   View image
Railroad Avenue was renamed Alaskan Way in 1936.
 
14-15Receiving ward   View image
 
16-17Check room at headquarters   View image
 
18-19Shelter #1, tailor shop   View image
 
20-21Shelter #1, laundry rooms
 
22-23Shelter #1, sterilizer
 
24-25Shelter #1, shower room
 
26-27Shelter #1, shoe repair shop   View image
 
28-29Occupational chart
 
30-31Shelter #1, recreation room   View image
The Salvation Army held services and prayer meetings in the recreation rooms.
 
32-33Number two corps auditorium at the Salvation Army chapel
 
34-35First-aid cabinet   View image
 
36-37Harborview Hospital

Subject Terms

Organizations:
Salvation Army. Advisory Board (Seattle, Wash.)
Subjects:
Depressions--1929--Washington (State)--Seattle.
Shelters for the homeless--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs.
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