Historical Background

Scope and Content

Digital Content

Restrictions on Access

Restrictions on Use

Custodial History

Acquisition Info

Processing Info

Other Finding Aids

Inventory

Subject Terms


Guide to the Minidoka Relocation Camp Photograph Collection
1942-1943



VM Collection No.: 384
Creator: Fukuyama, Betty , collector
Title: Minidoka Relocation Camp Photograph Collection
Date Span: 1942-1943
Quantity: 13 photographic prints (1 box)
Location: HC0470
Languages: Collection materials are in English.
Chefs preparing lunch at the Minidoka Relocation Center, 1942. Photo: Francis Stewart. Special Collections, UW Libraries, UW22293z

Funding for encoding this finding aid was partially provided through a grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.



Historical Background

The Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 led to fear and concern within the United States. Residents along the Pacific Coast of the U.S. were particularly affected by this event and feared additional bombing of their cities, homes, and businesses. The public demanded that residents of Japanese ancestry be evacuated from their homes and relocated to inland locations. This outcry resulted in Executive Order 9066, which was signed by President Roosevelt on February 19, 1942. Executive Order 9066 evacuated, relocated, and interned 120,000 American citizens and permanent resident aliens who were of Japanese ancestry. President Roosevelt established the War Relocation Authority in March 1942 to oversee the construction of relocation centers on federally owned land in remote locations in six western states and Arkansas.

The Minidoka Relocation Center was established in August, 1942, in central Idaho and operated until October, 1945. The center was comprised of more than six hundred buildings including administrative, religious, residential, educational, medical, manufacturing, warehouse, and security structures. The people lived in barracks and shared communal facilities. They engaged in light manufacturing, agriculture, and livestock production in order to provide food and clothing for the camp. President Clinton designated the Center a national monument on January 17th, 2001.

Scope and Content

The photographs in this collection document life at the Minidoka Relocation Center near Hunt, Idaho. They were made for the U.S. War Relocation Authority and taken by photographer Francis Stewart in 1942 and 1943. The majority of the photographs show the people participating in the day-to-day activities of the Center. Other photographs in this collection portray individuals engaging in their respective professions in the Center; the back of these photographs includes the name, former place of employment, and current occupation in the relocation center. In addition, there are two panoramic photographs of the Center.

Digital Content

View selections from the collection in digital format.

Restrictions on Access

The collection is open to the public.

Restrictions on Use

Restrictions may exist on reproduction, quotation, or publication. Contact Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries for details.

Custodial History

The photographs were transferred from the Betty Fukuyama Papers, 1944-1991 (manuscripts Accession no. 4411-1, 4411-2).

Acquisition Info

Gift of Mary A. Fukuyama, Gainesville, Florida on June 14, 1993, July 21, 1993, and Aug. 5, 1994. The photographs were from her mother, Betty Fukuyama, who was born Betty Marie Adkins in Heppner, Oregon, in 1922. She married Tom (Tsutomu Tom) Fukuyama, the son of pioneer Japanese immigrants, in 1945. Tom Fukuyama served as a clergyman while interned in the Minidoka Relocation Center during the early 1940s. Betty Fukuyama died in 1992.

Processing Info

Processed by Rebekah Dalby, 2002.

These photographs were relocated from the Betty Fukuyama Papers, Manuscript Collection 4411, which is also available in the Special Collections division of the University of Washington Libraries.

Other Finding Aids

These photographs form part of the Betty Fukuyama Papers, which are described and indexed in A Guide to the Betty Fukuyama Papers .


Inventory

 
 Date
1Minidoka Relocation Center, Hunt, Idaho   View imageDec. 9, 1942
 
2Mrs. Eizo Nishi in her barracks apartment   View imageDec. 9, 1942
 
3Community store in Block 30   View imageDec. 9, 1942
 
4Children in free-hand drawing class   View imageDec. 9, 1942
 
5Student Tatsuo Matsuda serving as a model in drawing class   View imageDec. 9, 1942
 
6Architect George Nakashima (formerly an architect in Seattle) constructing and decorating model apartment   View imageDec. 9, 1942
 
7Carpenter O. Kenneth Hikogawa (formerly a carpenter in Tacoma) polishing "grease-wood" to make furniture   View imageDec. 9, 1942
 
8Chef Dave H. Yoshida (formerly employed by Benjamin Franklin Hotel in Seattle) and crew preparing lunch   View imageDec. 9, 1942
 
9Minidoka Relocation Center   View imageDec. 10, 1942
 
10Watchmaker Sokichi Hoshide (formerly a watchmaker in Seattle) in watch repair shop   View imageDec. 10, 1942
 
11Hospital ward   View imageDec. 10, 1942
 
12Dental laboratory   View imageDec. 10, 1942
 
13Toshi Boi and Henry Kumasaka sledding   View imageJan. 9, 1943

Subject Terms

Personal Names:
Stewart, Francis, photographer.
Stewart, Francis.
Organizations:
Minidoka Relocation Center--Photographs.
United States. War Relocation Authority.
Subjects:
Concentration camp inmates--Idaho--Hunt--Photographs.
Concentration camps--Idaho--Hunt--Photographs.
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945.
Japanese Americans--Photographs.
World War, 1939-1945--Concentration camps--Idaho--Hunt--Photographs.
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans--Photographs.
Last modified: March 10, 2010
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