Biographical Note

Scope and Content

General Notes

Digital Content

Restrictions on Access

Restrictions on Use

Acquisition Info

Processing Info

Inventory   [ + ]

Subject Terms


Guide to the Thomas Prosch Seattle Views Photograph Albums



PH Collection No.: 27
Creator: Prosch, Thomas Wickham, 1850-1915 , collector
Title: Thomas Prosch Seattle Views photograph albums
Date Span: circa 1851-1906
Quantity: .5 cubic feet (1 box plus 1 folder)
171 photographic prints (2 albums)
Location: K900 (1 folder of photocopies for viewing)
KV962 (Restricted)
Languages: Collection materials are in English.
Yesler Way east from Post Street following the fire in 1889. Special Collections, UW Libraries, UW 5947




Biographical Note

Son of pioneer parents, Charles and Susan Prosch, Thomas Prosch came with his family to the Pacific Coast in 1855 from Brooklyn, New York. The elder Prosch was a printer and in 1858 founded the Puget Sound Herald at Steilacoom. In his early years, Thomas Prosch worked for his father as well as in a number of other jobs including clerking in the state legislature and the customs office at Port Townsend.

About 1869, the Prosch family, now residing in Olympia, acquired the Pacific Tribune newspaper. When ownership of the paper passed to Thomas in 1872, he moved to Tacoma, and later to Seattle where he continued its publication and eventually sold it. About 1879, Thomas Prosch and Samuel L. Crawford bought the Intelligencer newspaper. Two years later, the paper was merged with the Post to become the Post-Intelligencer.

From 1876 onward, Prosch was involved with a series of jobs and activities relating to the City of Seattle. In 1876, Prosch was appointed postmaster of Seattle by President Grant. He had charge of the municipal census of Seattle in 1890 and at the same time was special agent in charge of the federal census. In the early 1890's he served three years as a member of the Seattle School Board. In 1894 he aided in platting the tidelands of Seattle and Tacoma. He was also active in the Seattle Chamber of Commerce and a member and officer of various pioneer and historical societies including the Washington Pioneer's association.

His later life was devoted to historical writing and collecting. He died in 1915.

Scope and Content

The collection includes two photographic albums containing 169 images collected and annotated by Thomas Prosch. The photographs were taken by local photographers, among them Asahel Curtis, Webster & Stevens, George Moore, John P. Soule, Theodore Peiser and the Peterson Brothers Studio. The albums trace the early history of Seattle and vicinity, circa 1851-1906. Images include the Seattle Fire of 1889, early businesses and pioneer families.

General Notes

All Asahel Curtis and Webster & Stevens photographs are copies. All photographs by John Soule are originals.

Digital Content

View the digital version of the collection

Photocopies are available for reference use.

Restrictions on Access

Access restricted. Originals not available for use. Photocopied albums are available for viewing. The entire collection is also available online.

Restrictions on Use

Restrictions may exist on reproduction, quotation, or publication. Contact Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries for details.

Acquisition Info

Donor: Edith D. Prosch, circa 1921.

Processing Info

Processed by Ashby Lee Collinson, 2006 and Marion Brown, 2009


Inventory

 
Album Item Date
Album 1
11Photograph of a drawing of the Denny house at Alki Point   View imageundated
Written on page: One of Seattle's first houses.
2aPortrait of Arthur Armstrong Denny   View imagecirca 1890

Photographer: McClaire, Seattle
2bPortrait of Hillory Butler about 1890circa 1890
3Group at the unveiling of the Alki Point Monument   View imageNovember 13, 1905

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (353)
Written on the photo: Survivors of first landed settlers.
Written on page: Lenora Denny, Carson D. Boren, Mary A. Denny, Rolland H. Denny, Mary Low Sinclair
4Mary A. Denny, Rolland H. Denny, Lenora Denny at the unveiling of the Alki Point Monument   View image November 13, 1905

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (355)
Written on the photo: Monument from the west.
5-6Pioneers of Washington at Lake Washington Pavilion   View imageJune 21, 1906

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (337 & 358)
7Henry L. Yesler and Sarah B. Yesler   View imageJuly 4th, 1883

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (302)
Written on the page: At their old home, corner of First Avenue and James Street.
8Arthur A Denny commemorative tablet   View imageundated

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (339)
Written on the page: One of seven bronze tablets unveiled November 13th, 1905 in Seattle
The tablet reads: Arthur A Denny In his log cabin home on this spot opened the first Post Office of Seattle August 27, 1853. This tablet was erected by the Washington University State Historical Society....November 13, 1905
9Freeport, Milton, or West Seattle   View image1872
Written on the page: Freeport, a sawmill and mill town, built by Williamson (J.R.) and others, in 1863-'64. Name was changed to Milton, by E.L. Marshall, in the 70's and in the 80's to West Seattle, by W.S. L. & L.. Co.
10Territorial University (University of Washington)   View imagecirca 1895

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (178)
Written on the page: The University of Washington Territory, as built in 1861. The line of tall timber was then Fourth Avenue, in which the building partly stood.
11Home of University of Washington President   View imagecirca 1895

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (179)
Written on the page: House was between Fourth and Fifth Avenues, south side on Seneca Street. Dense timber in rear, east to Lake Washington.
12Student housing for the Territorial University   View imagecirca 1890s
Written on page: The student house of Washington University, built in Territorial days upon the campus, and occupied by many young people who later became useful, leading citizens.
13aHouse built by Charles Plummer in 1859   View imagecirca 1890s
Written on the page: House built by Charles Rummer in 1859, on northeast corner Jackson Street and Occidental Avenue. It was long one of the finest dwellings in Seattle. The land is now covered by one of the large manufacturing and mercantile houses of the city.
13bBuildings constructed by Charles Plummer in 1858undated
Written on photo: The large building here was built by Charles Plummer in 1858, on the southwest corner of First Avenue South and Main Street. In it he conducted a general store for many years, usually having a partner-Harris Deshaw or Hinds. On the upper floor was Plummer's Hall. This house and the dwelling were burned June 6, 1889.
14a North end of Seattle from Columbia to Union Street   View image1871
14bFirst Avenue from Cherry Street North1878
15Mill street   View image1876

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (23)
Written on page: View to westward, from Second Avenue and Yesler Way, in 1876, showing old Occidental Hotel, Yesler mill, shops, the Sound and Duwamish Head.
16Group standing on porch of house built by D.E. Blaine   View imageundated
Written on page: This house stood on the east side of Second Avenue, near Cherry street, next to the first M.E. Church. It was built by D.E. Blaine, and occupied by his family, by the E. Hanford family and by D. Horton's, the last owners. The New York building now occupies the site.
17West end of Yesler wharf   View image1878

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (94)
Written on the page: Logs in foreground belonged to sawmill, then leased to J.M. Colman. Coal bunker on north end of wharf. Freeport, Milton or West Seattle opposite side of bay.
This is a copy of a Peterson Brothers photograph, to which Peiser added his name.
18Post Building   View image circa 1880
Written on page: Post Building, erected by John Leary, in 1881. Finest business house then in Seattle. Home of Post-Intelligencer nearly eight years. Location: Yesler Way, north side, corner Post street.
19Ruins of the Seattle Post Building   View imageJune 1889
Written on the page: In the great fire of June 1889, the Post or P-I Building was destroyed. Its ruins are shown above. It left an enduring mark in Seattle history, on account of its name, the newspaper, the street, its owner, its character and cost, the latter being $30,000 or in excess of any other house pion to 1882.
20Men in front of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer building   View imagecirca 1874
Written on the page: Among those on the front is S.L. Maxwell, founder and then publisher. The house stood on First Avenue, westside, south of Cherry street, opposite the present Newman building. It was built and owned by H.L. Yesler. The man standing above, in front of letter C was Isaac M. Hall, an attorney, whose law office was there. The City Council in 1876 used the same room as its place of meeting. The Intelligencer in 1875 moved to the north a short distance, the vacated printing office being taken by Boyd, Poncin & Young for their dry goods store.
21Gardner Kellogg standing in front of house he built   View imagecirca 1902

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (247)
Written on page: Built in 186- by Gardner Kellogg at southeast corner Fourth and Columbia and occupied there as a residence until 1883 by the Kelloggs and Colmans. Moved to Sixth and Columbia in 1883, and there stood twenty years, when torn down. In the picture Gardner Kellogg stands at corner. Date of picture about 1902.
22The W. A. Jennings Store and the San Francisco Store on First Avenue South   View image1878

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (244)
Written on the page: The Phelps & Wadleigh meat market, Treen shoe store, Toklas & Singerman clothing store, and Jennings Grocery are shown. Bystanders here are Wm. A. Jennings, Ed. Reynolds, George Finn, Frank Rummer, Melody Choir, Paul Singerman, D.B. Jackson, Bailey Gatzert and others.
Written on the photo: West side of commercial street between Washington and Main, Seattle 1877.
23Shops, including the Chicago Boot Store, and people on east side of First Avenue at end near Cherry Street   View image1888
Written on the page: Buildings shown are Sullivan's, Yesler Hall, Masonic Hall, etc. Piper's Bakery was there; the Lowman & Hanford Store, and the beginning of the Seattle Hardware Company, then Ballard & Sox. James Hamilton Lewis, then a new, young attorney, had office upstairs over hardware store.
24First street car in Seattle at Occidental Ave. and Yesler Way   View imagecirca 1884
Written on page: The first street car in Seattle. George Washington (colored) was driver. He says he drove the first car, starting Wednesday, Sept. 23rd, 1884. F.H. Osgood, manager and chief owner, stands by horses; E.B. Downing on back step; Mrs. Osgood, Mrs. Struve, Mrs. Harrington, Mayor Leary and City Councilmen seated inside. Scene: Occidental Avenue and Yesler Way.
25 Steamer Olympian   View image1887

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (113)
Written on the page: The Olympian was beached and wrecked in Straight of Magellan in 1906.
26-27Seattle from Pike Street and Second Avenue   View image1871
28Trinity Episcopal Church and Rectory   View imageundated
Written on page: As built, the church faced on Jefferson Street. Later was turned, and made to face on Third Avenue, a tower built on front and an addition on rear. The ministers, in order, were: Itas F. Roberts, R. W. Summers, Charles R. Bonnell and George Herbert Watson. Both houses burned June 6, 1889.
29Grace Hospital   View imageundated

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (220)
Written on page: Grace Hospital, built by Trinity Church interests.
30Seattle from Second Avenue and Pike Street   View image1879

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (27)
31Seattle from King Street and the bay   View image1881

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (38)
Written on page: Seattle in 1881, from King Street and the bay. The Felker house and Maynard's can be seen. The big houses down town are the Arlington Hotel and Squire Opera House.
32Railroad terminal   View imagecirca 1879-1882

Photographer: Theodore E. Peiser (39)
Written on page: Seattle's first railroad terminal--King street west of First Avenue South-1879-'82.
33Buildings on First Avenue, Seattle.   View image1888
Written on the page: The east side of First Avenue South between Main and Washington Streets, in 1888, showing Wyckoff, McNaught, Squire (the Brunswick) and Matthais buildings.
34The Dr. G.A. Weed house   View image1878
Written on page: Sold to M.V.B. Stacey, and resold by him to John Leary. On Second Avenue and Madison Street. Torn down and the parts burned in 1908.
35The H.L. Yesler dwelling   View imagecirca 1888-1901
Written on page: On block surrounded by James, Jefferson, Third and Fourth streets and avenues. The Terry home is to be seen in front on block opposite. While occupied by City Library the Yesler house was burned January 1st, 1901. Built in 1887-8 at cost of $50,000.
36Winter street scene   View image 1884-1885
Written on page: Yesler, Leary, Occidental and Colman buildings are depicted. Courthouse behind Occidental. Snow 20 inches deep.
37Looking up Yesler way from Post Street   View imageJune 5th, 1889
Written on page: Looking up Yesler Way from Post Street, June 5th, 1889. Buildings seen are Post, Yesler, Leary, Occidental, Schwabacher and Colman."
Written on photo: Yesler Ave East from R.R.
38aYesler Leary Building   View image1888
Showing horse drawn wagons.
38bYesler Leary Building1889
Written on page: Front street (or First Avenue) cable line and car appear.
39View from Yesler Way and Occidental Avenue, looking west   View imageJune 5th, 1899
Written on page: The Korn, Occidental and Yesler. Leary buildings are seen.
40View of the west side of First Avenue, Cherry Street to Columbia   View image1888
Written on page: Houses shown are C.P. Stone's, Safe Deposit, Poncin's, Union and Toklas & Singerman's.
41Ships docked at the wharves, foot of Jackson and Main Streets   View image1889
42Ship Memnon tipped over on wharf   View imageSeptember 1885
Written on page: Bark Memnon on her beam ends at Stetson and Post wharf. September, 1885
43View up First Avenue South looking north from near Jackson Street   View image1874
Written on page: The two nearest houses are the New England Hotel, on the left, and the United States Hotel, on the right, both at Main Street corners. The locality shown was the business center of the town then and for some years following.
Written on photo: Seattle 1874 Commercial Street.
44Seattle anti-Chinese riot   View imageFebruary 8, 1886
Written on page: This is a reproduction of a drawing in Harper's Weekly representing the Seattle anti-Chinese riot of February 8, 1886. The location is in front of the New England Hotel, on the corner of Main Street and First Avenue South. The Chinese are in the middle; Captain George Kinnear's Home Guards protecting them, and the rioters surrounding and attacking. It is a fair picture.
45Drawing of the execution of three murderers, Howard, Payne and Sullivan in Seattle   View imageJanuary 18, 1882
Written on page: Yesler Home. Photograph from a drawing by A.W. Piper. Quite accurate.
Yesler and Grass are identified in drawing.
46Seattle looking east from Jackson and bay   View image1888
47Seattle from the ship at the foot of Main Street   View imagecirca 1888-1889
Written on photo: Seattle Looking East
48Ruins of the Horton stone buildings on First Avenue South and Washington Street   View imageJune 6, 1889
Written on page: The Horton stone buildings on First Avenue South and Washington Street, after fire of June 6, 1889. These houses were the first ones in Seattle. They were the only houses in burned district that were or could be made habitable after the fire. The former occupants were doing business in them in July.
49District burned in the Seattle fire   View imageJune 16, 1889
Written on page: The district burned over in Seattle June 6th, 1889. Photographed about ten days after fire.
50Canoes and Indians on city front beach   View imagecirca 1900

Photographer: Wilse (1010)
Written on page: A common scene in 1882, '83, '84, '85, '86, at the west end of Vine, Cedar, Broad streets, Seattle. The canoes were those of Indians on their way from the north to the hopfields of White and Puyallup Valleys. This part of the city front has since been covered by four lines of railroad, wharves, warehouses, shops, streets, etc.
51Men standing in front of the Yesler Mill Cook House   View imageundated
Written on page: Built in 1852, it stood on First Avenue South, between Yesler Way and Washington street. It not only served as cooking and eating place, but was office for Yesler's Mill and for County Auditor Yesler. Court and public meetings, as also religious services, were held in it. The Avenue looked as here shown in the 60s.
52Men, oxen and logs on a wooden railroad bridge   View image1885
Written on page: The south end of Seattle in 1885. Logging exhibit in the foreground-oxen, train of logs, etc., on Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad.
53Men and logs on a wooden railroad bridge   View image1885
Written on page: Same scene and time as preceding picture. There have been great changes in that district since these pictures were taken.
54aChurch of Our Lady of Good Help   View imagecirca 1870-1871
Written on page: The Church of our Lady of Good Help, the first of the Roman Catholics in Seattle, built by Father F.X. Prefontaine, in 1870-71. The clothes line on north side was that of the D.K. Baxter family, who lived in the house the verandah of which is partially seen.
54bMemorial service for President Garfield1881
Written on page: The President Garfield Memorial Services (October, 1881) in front of Occidental Hotel and on James street. Trinity Church and Rectory show in picture. The timber line was then on Seventh and more eastern avenues.
There is some disagreement on when this memorial service actually took place. Some sources say September 26th, September 27th or October. However, all sources agree this took place outside the Occidental Hotel in 1881.
See also page 66 in Album 2
55Photograph of a woodcut print of Denny Cabin   View image1851
Written on image: Denny Cabin. Alki Point. 1851. From a wood cut.
56Photograph of a drawing of Seattle   View image1874
Written on page: Seattle in 1874, from a drawing by Eastman. The original is more distinct, being on a larger scale, and is remarkably truthful, as much so, almost, as a photograph.
57Photograph of a painting of the Steamer Eliza Anderson   View imagecirca 1870s
Written on page: Built at Portland, brought to Puget Sound in 1859, ran until 1871, then laid aside, and allowed to go to ruin on the beach at Seattle. This photo is from a painting in the later 70s by Mrs. H.F. Beecher. Subsequently, the steamer was renewed and put into trade. In 1897 she was wrecked at Dutch Harbor, Alaska
58Steamer Politkofsky at Port Blakely   View image1888

Photographer: Joseph W. Phillips
Written on page: Photo by Joseph W. Phillips. Mrs. Phillips and Mrs. Campbell sitting on deck with children. This steamer was built in Alaska during Russian times. She came to Puget Sound in 1868, and for 29 years was here used as a towboat. She returned to Alaska in 1897, and was used at St. Michael for several years. Her hull now lies on the beach there, abandoned.
59Seattle from Cherry Street to James Street   View image1860
Written on page: This is the oldest, or first, known photograph of any part of Seattle. It represents that part of the town from the south line of Cherry Street on the left to the north line of James on the right, extending from First to Third Avenues east and west. The buildings shown are the Yesler dwelling in the foreground, and two barns or outbuilding of his. The Hillory Butler home is back of Yesler's. Opposite the nearest barn is the L.V. Wyckoff house. On its right is the H.A. Smith house, South of James street is the S.D. Libby house, later that of John Collins. These buildings occupied ground now covered by immense brick houses, reaching up to sixteen stories in one case. The pole shown stood in front of the Yesler sawmill, where Pioneer Place now is. A V-shaped flume shows in the picture. It brought water down James street. Seattle's first shade trees, framed in, are seen, or supposed to be seen on the right of the Yesler house.
This photograph is a copy of the original.
60North Pacific Brewery   View imageundated
Written on page: The building shown in this picture was the North Pacific Brewery, built in the 1860s, and for along time owned by Martin Schmieg and Amos Brown. For a time the Brown family lived on the second floor. Its location was the southwest corner of Columbia Street and First Avenue.

 
Album Item Date
Album 2
21Seattle, looking North from the corner of Third Avenue and Virginia Street   View image1882
Written on page: Seattle in 1882. Looking north from the corner of Third Avenue and Virginia Street. The wharf was G.L. Manning's; the octagonal dwelling on First Avenue was John Nation's, later Dr. O.G. Root's. The two-story dwelling was the house of E.S. Ingraham, it was at Lenora and Second.
Written on photo: No. B 5226. Bell Town, Seattle, W.T.
2Seattle looking south and east from Third Avenue and Pine Street   View image1882
Written on page: The houses shown here include three University buildings, Providence Hospital, Central School, Plymouth Church, and the dwellings (on Third Avenue) of Dr. J. Settle, Mrs. Calhoun, Mrs. Jackling, Busby, John Denny, Walter Harmon, A. Mackintosh, Dr. Horton and others. Probably not ten of the houses in the view are now (1910) standing. Seattle in 1882; Looking south and east from Third and Pine, showing Third Avenue and Pike Street, and Beacon Hill in the distance.
3Wharf and ships covered in snow   View image1880
Written on page: One of the wharves in the great snow of 1880.
4Main Street and First Avenue South covered with snow   View imageJanuary 1880

Photographer: John Soule
Written on page: The great snow of January (7 to 11)1880. View from Main Street and First Avenue South to the south (north).
5View from Third and Cherry showing tents after the Great Fire   View image Summer 1889

Photographer: John Soule
Written on page: View from Third and Cherry in summer of 1889.
6View of Second Avenue, north of Cherry Street   View image August 1889

Photographer: John Soule
Written on page: This is the way Second Avenue north of Cherry Street looked in August of 1889.
7View of Yesler Way, west of Third Avenue showing ruins and tents   View imageSummer 1889

Photographer: John Soule
Written on page: Yesler Way west of Third Avenue in the summer of 1889.
8View southwest of Third Avenue and Jefferson showing ruins and tents   View imageAugust 1889

Photographer: John Soule
Written on page: Southwest of Third and Jefferson in August, 1889.
9View of Occidental Avenue and Washington Street looking North   View imagecirca 1870s

Photographer: Webster & Stevens (22x)
Written on page: Seattle, from Occidental Avenue and Washington Street, looking north, in the 1870s
10Seattle waterfront   View imagecirca 1880s

Photographer: Webster & Stevens (59x)
Written on page: Seattle waterfront in the middle 1880s. The nearest wharf is Colman's, Columbia street; next is Yesler's, with many buildings, and beyond the wharves of the Oregon Improvement Company."
11First Avenue North of Yesler Way, including the Yesler-Leary House and the Frye Opera   View image1887

Webster & Stevens (115x)
Written on page: First Avenue north of Yesler Way in 1887. The Yesler Leary was the first big house on the left, the Frye Opera the big house on the distant right. The horse cars ran up James Street, and north on Second Avenue, the First was the better business street.
12Men standing around train engine   View imageDecember, 1871

Webster & Stevens (32x)
Written on page: Seattle's first railroad. This was the Lake Union end of a small road that extended to the west end of Pike street. The engine weighed two tons, and the coal cars drawn carried two tons. It was owned and operated by the S.C.& T. Co. from 1871 to 1877. This picture was probably taken on December 1871, when the first engine was put on the track.
13View of First Avenue South, including the New England Hotel and Squire Opera House   View image1881
Written on page: First Avenue South north of Main Street in 1881. The large building on the left was the New England Hotel, and the one on the right was the Squire Opera House. The view is of Seattle's main business and residence quarters at that time.
14Home of W.N. Bell   View imagecirca 1869-1870
Written on page: The black building in the center of this picture was the house of W. N. Bell, on the northwest corner of Second Avenue and Cherry Street, where the 18-story Hoge Building was erected in 1911. The site was that of the home of C.D. Boren, who took the land claim there in 1852, and who sold the lot to Bell in 1855.
15North side of Mill Street (later Yesler Way), west of First Avenue   View image1871

Photographer: George Moore
Written on page: This represents the north side of Yesler Way, then Mill street, west of First Avenue in 1871. The mill and buildings were H.L. Yesler's; the stores were L. Reinig's Bakery, M.A Kelly's Drug store, F.V Snyder's City Market, and Coombs and Pumphrey's Book and Stationary Store. Tide water, in the 1850s, came as far east as these buildings. Where they stood, Yesler's first mill was erected in 1852-53. The street surface shown was mill refuse-chiefly sawdust.
16The Occidental Hotel   View image1871
Written on page: The Occidental was Seattle's leading hotel for many years. It was then kept by John Collins. The house near it was the Hillory Butler home. Beyond it are the G. Kellogg, O.C. Shorey, D.V. Hyde and other pioneer homes. The timber line then was about Fifth Avenue. These pictures were stereopticon.
This photograph was copied from a stereo view.
17View from Pine and Third Streets to the southeast   View image1876
Written on page: View from Pine and Third to south and east in 1876.
18Seattle from Madison Street North to Pine and Virginia streets   View image1878

Photographer: Peterson Bro Artists, Seattle W.T.
Written on page: Seattle from Madison Street north to Pine and Virginia. In the foreground is the hulk of the bark Windward wrecked in 1875. The background is between Second and Third Avenues.
19Seattle viewed from wooden bridge   View imagecirca 1880s

Webster & Stevens (172x)
Written on page: This was the extreme south end of Seattle in the mid year of 1880s
20The intersection of James Street, Yesler way and First Avenue   View imagecirca 1876-1880

Webster & Stevens (140x)
Written on page: The intersection of James Street, Yesler Way and First Avenue 1876 to 1880. On the right are the Butler building and the Yesler home; on the left the Occidental Hotel, Colman brick and other buildings.
21Seattle, south of Yesler Way and west of Third Avenue, showing tents and ruins of the fire   View imagecirca July 1, 1889
Written on page: This is rather an obscure view of that part of Seattle south of Yesler Way and west of Third Avenue about the 1st of July, 1889. What shows up like a house on the right was the stone buildings of Dexter Horton on the corner of Washington Street and First Avenue South. They were refloored, rewindowed, etc. and used again in business for a year or so, they being the only houses in the fire district that could be used."
22 U.S.S. Decatur   View imagecirca 1855
Written on page: The Decatur, built in 1839, came to Seattle in 1855. She was called a "sloop of war," being less than a frigate or "line of battleship." She then (1855) carried sixteen guns, and had a crew of 104 men. She took part in the defense of Seattle against the Indians in 1855-56. In after years the Decatur was in the Puget Sound lumber trade. This a picture taken at one of the Atlantic Yards when the vessel was new, and when she seemed to have more guns."
23Seattle, looking south from Second and Pine   View image1882
Written on page: Seattle in 1882, looking south from near-north of- Second and Pine, at the heart of the town. This picture and the one on opposite page are really two parts of one view."
24View of Seattle from the harbor, showing Madison Street to King Street   View image1882
Written on page: This picture and the one following connect in one view of Seattle from Madison Street to about King Street, in 1882.
25View of Seattle from the wharves on Washington and Main Streets   View image1882
Written on page: The wharves were on Washington and Main Streets, and belonged to the Oregon Improvement Co. The large houses near the front were the Hinds at North and New England Hotel in middle, and Arlington Hotel at south end. The Felker or Anderson house, 1853, is at south end on front. The Roman Catholic, Episcopal show, with crosses; also half of Baptist Church at northside. These churches were the first of their denominations. King Count's first Courthouse is shown in this picture at Third Avenue and Jefferson Street.
26View of Seattle from trestle at wharf on Jackson Street South   View image1882
Written on page: Seattle from Jackson Street south, in 1882. The trestle on the front is the coal wharf of the Co. Columbia and Puget Sound Railway Co. The Company's shops are seen up the (King) street. The Felker house, owned by A.C. Anderson, with maple trees in front and behind, shown on Jackson street near First Avenue; the Geo. W. Bullene house, on First Avenue, faces the view. Next to it is James Mc. [illegible]inley's house, [illegible] Stetson & Post mill, [illegible]ing and First [illegible]minet. The forest line then was about Sixth Avenue.
27Seattle, from King Street waterfront to east and south   View image1882
Written on page: Seattle, from King Street waterfront, to east and south in 1882. Beacon Hill, covered with timber is to be seen. The bit of wharf and the pile road near shore belonged to the C. & P. Ry Co. The white spots on the side hill were dwelling houses. The bay then, as shown here, is now filled with earth and covered with streets, houses and railroad tracks. The mill on the left or north is the Stetson & Post sash and door factory; the mill on the right or south is the Stetson & Postsash cutting or board making establishment. It was destroyed by fire in 1885.
28Seattle, looking northwest from Dearborn Street and Twelfth Avenue South   View image1882
Written on page: Seattle in 1882, from Dearborn Street and Twelfth Avenue South, looking N.W. Among buildings are Stetson & Post Sawmill, gas works, County Courthouse, Catholic, Episcopal and Methodist Churches, Squire's Opera House, Frauenthal and Post buildings, [illegible].
29Third Avenue from Spring Street to Pike Street, and Union Street from Second Avenue to Fourth Avenue   View image1871

Photographer: George Moore
Written on page: Thru the center of this picture runs Third Avenue from Spring Street to Pike and Union from Second Avenue to Fourth, as they appeared in 1871 from near Second Avenue and Pine street, Houses shown Buzby, John Denny, Mackintosh, Fisher dwellings, Central School University, and others."
30Seattle, from First Avenue South and Washington Street   View image1873

Photographer: George Moore
Written on page: Seattle, in 1873, from First Avenue South and Washington Street. Among prominent buildings are Masonic Hall, Tower of M.E. Church, Wyckoff dwelling, the Pinkham, Naher, Sullivan, Meydenbauer, Robbins, and Freeman stores, also Grose's barber shop, etc. The woods or tree line was Fifth Avenue, to Sixth.
31Seattle, from First Avenue South and Washington Street   View image1873

Photographer: George Moore
Written on page: A second view, of the same locality, in 1873. In this picture is shown more on left or west side, including the first bank-Horton & Co. the nearest house--Schwabacher's new brick store, a number of Yesler Way shops, the Yesler Hall, or Pavillion, Central School, etc. When new these pictures were very plain, it being possible to recognize the men, read the signs, etc.
32Photograph of drawing of Seattle, from Columbia Street to First Avenue   View image1871
Written on page: The above is the photographic copy of a drawing that appeared in Harper's in 1870, at the time Wm. H. Seward was in Seattle. It represented that portion of Seattle from Columbia Street and First Avenue to the old University at Seneca and Fourth. The large buildings on the water front were those of the North Pacific Brewery, then owned by Schmieg & Brown. The M.E. Church and M.P. Church on Second Avenue, show plainly. The dwelling on Third and Columbia, back of the M.E. Church, is the O.C. Shorey house. On the north of that church is the parsonage, and on the south two houses of the Dexter Horton's. On the front the north end is near Madison Street.
33Watercolor painting of a ship   View imageundated
34People gathering outside St. Mark's Church   View imagecirca 1896
Written on page: Saint mark's church, when new or about 1896.
35St. Mark's Church, Seattle   View image1906

Photographer: Webster & Stevens (4715)
36Seattle waterfront and sailboats   View imagecirca 1885-1886
Written on page: Seattle in 1885-'86. The waterfront extends from Madison to Columbia Street. The big building in the center is Frye's Opera House. The Methodist Protestant church is shown north of Frye's; the McNaught and Stacy dwellings to the east, also Stetson & Post. The fire of June 6, 1889, began in house on extreme left, belonging to Mrs. Margaret Pontius.
37 Fourth of July celebration on James Street   View imagecirca 1866
Written on page: Celebration of the Fourth of July about 1886. The scene was the west end of James street. Houses shown are the Occidental Hotel, built in 1865, on the right, and on the left the H.L. Yesler. H.A. Smith and C.C. Terry dwellings, the latter also built in 1865. The timber line then was Fourth Avenue.
38aView from near Jackson Street and First Avenue   View imagecirca 1863
Written on page: This view was taken from near Jackson Street and First Avenue South, about 1863. The first Yesler sawmill is shown about the middle of the picture.
38bView from near Jackson Street and First Avenue Southcirca 1866
Written on page: This is the same scene, from a slightly different angle, about 1866. The saw mill shows in this, too. The flag pole, Seattle's first, is seen in both views. It stood at the present Pioneer Place. In this picture the M.E. Church, Masonic Hall, Occidental Hotel are conspicuous. The timber line is about Fifth Avenue.
39House on a beach   View imageundated
Written on page: The home of an old settler-Indian Charley- on Shilshole Bay.
40Photograph of a photograph of Mrs. Louisa Boren Denny   View imageundated
Written on photograph: Mrs. Louisa B. Denny
Written on page: Nee Louisa Boren, who has lived in Seattle continuously since Nov. 13, 1851. In January, 1853, she married David. T. Denny, they being the first white couple married in King County."
41aHudson's Bay Company steamer Beaver   View imagecirca 1836-1888
Written on page: H.B. Company's steamer Beaver in Victoria harbor. She was the first steamer on the Pacific Ocean. Sailed from England Aug 27, 1835, and arrived at Fort Vancouver April 10, 1836, under sail. She ran until July, 1888, when she ran on the rocks in Burrard Inlet, and there remained."
41bHudson's Bay Company steamer Otter circa 1852-1853
Written on page: H.B. Company's steamer Otter (below).Built in 1852, she worked in British Columbia waters from 1853 to 1890, when she was broken up. She was 122 feet long, the Beaver 101.
42Sammis house on Yesler way   View imageundated
Written on page: This house stood on Yesler, south side opposite the Occidental Hotel. In the mid 1860s Gardner and David Kellogg had a drug store; A. S. [illegible]ham the variety store, and E. M. Sammis the photograph gallery. Sammis built this house. He was Seattle's early photographer, tho(sic) a man named Clark took pictures here before Sammis.
43First Avenue near Yesler way   View imagecirca 1880

Webster & Stevens (48x)
Written on page: This was a view of First Avenue near Yesler Way, looking north, about 1880. The far off end was Pine Street.
44Seattle from about Pine Street and Second Avenue to the southeast to about Madison Street and Ninth Avenue   View imagecirca 1877-1878
Written on page: A view of Seattle from about Pine Street and Second Avenue to the southeast-to about Madison Street and Ninth Avenue- taken about 1877 or 1878.
45Seattle, from Seventh and Jefferson Streets to the north   View image1886
Written on page: Seattle, in 1886, from Seventh and Jefferson to the north. The large house on the hill was the Central School. The rough street next to it is Sixth Avenue. James Street is shown between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. This was a residence district. About a dozen of the houses in this picture are still standing--1900.
46The east side of First Avenue between James and Cherry Streets   View image1886
Written on page: The east side of First Avenue between James and Cherry Streets in 1886. It was a cheap looking piece of town, but the people did not so consider it. In fact, they were proud of it.
47The University boarding house   View imageundated
Written on page: The University boarding house, that stood and served for thirty years on the campus, about where University Street and Fifth Avenue now are.
48Amos Brown dwelling   View image1911
Written on page: "An old settler" among the "new comers"--the Amos Brown dwelling built in 1870, on First Avenue and Spring Street, as it stands in 1911 surrounded by lofty modern business houses.
49 Cherry Street from First to Fifth Avenue during the Great Snow of 1880   View imageJanuary 1880
Written on bottom of page: Cherry Street from First to Fifth Avenue, in the great snow of January, 1880. The depth was three to four feet, in some places more. Much damage was done.
Left Side A.C. Anderson on Fourth. J.R. Lewis, on Third. Horton's vacant lots. Three belonging to H.B. Bagley west of Second. Chris Schuerman, on First.
Right Side: John Condon on Fifth. S.W. Russelt, First Baptist Church, on Fourth, T.S. Russel, on Third. L.V. Wyckoff on Second. Yesler Hall on First. In all 61 inches of snow fell in that storm, and 102 inches during 1880.
50Seattle waterfront   View image1878

Photographer: Peterson Bro Artist, Seattle, W.T.
Written on page: In this view and the next is included 90 per cent of Seattle in 1878. In both is to be seen the wreck of the bark Windward, at Western Avenue and Marion Street. First Avenue, walled up with timber, was then next to the water.
51View to the south from Pike and Second Streets   View imagecirca 1878-1879
Written on photo: Mt. Rainier 11,444 ft high. Elliott Bay. Seattle, W.T.
Written on page: View to the south from Pike and Second in 1878-79
52Old Denny family home before being destroyed by the regrade project   View imageSeptember 17, 1911
Written on page: The Old Home of D.T. Denny and Family. Seattle Times, Sept. 17, 1911
From clipping accompanying photograph:
More than ordinary interest attaches to the wrecking of the big, roomy and even modern house which David. T. Denny built when growing affluence in the pioneer days made possible the moving of his family to their new abode. The house was two-story frame building, with an ornate porch in front, a shingle roof and large dining and living rooms, besides spacious bedrooms....
For many years the Denny home was regarded as a masterpiece of civic improvement and of the development of Seattle's home life.
Beyond the old home, gas tanks have reared their metal tops and the exacting demands of modern traffic conditions have called for the lowering of the surrounding hills. The old home is now dismantled, its windows blank, staring openings, its roof partly shattered. The house has long been tenantless and within a year or so it is expected that new factories, flats and business structures will be built on the old Denny homestead and the neighborhood surrounding it.
53Denny home with Marion shovel and crew out front during regrade work   View image1911
Written on page: Another view of the Denny home on Ninth Avenue, near Lake Union, as it looked in September 1911, while graders were making a deep cut in the street in front. The old barn and the new tanks of the Gas Company are shown. The dwelling was being torn down, as it could not stand with so deep a cut under the front.
54House at 1519 First Avenue built by Charles McDonald in 1869   View image1883
Written on page: Enlarged photo of house built at 1519 First Avenue by Charles McDonals in 1869, and occupied continuously forty years by J.H. Hall, C.B. Shatluck, T.W. Prosch and other families and people. It was one of the fine houses of the town, and brought the highest rent-$25. On the verandah are Mrs. Charles Prosch, Mrs. Thomas W. Prosch, and Master Arthur M. Prosch.
55Holiday parade on First Avenue South   View image1888
Written on page: Holiday Parade on First Avenue South, from Jackson Street to Yesler in 1888.
56Crowd watching holiday parade   View imagecirca 1886
Written on page: First Avenue north of Madison Street in 1886. The buildings on the left are the Kenyon and Brown; on the right Maddocks's, White & Tenney iron foundry, and Amos Brown and other dwellings.
57 Aerial view down First Avenue including shoe store and photography gallery   View image1887
Written on page: First Avenue north of Madison Street in 1887. The beginning of the steam railroad is to be seen, but not the street line, which was built in 1888.
58The Charles Plummer home   View imageundated
Written on page: The Charles Plummer home on northeast corner of Jackson Street and Occidental Avenue, one of Seattle's finest places in the 1860s and '70s. It was burned June 6, 1889. Plummer was a merchant, wharf owner and leading citizen, dating back to 1853.
59Territorial University building   View image1881
Written on page: The Territorial University as it looked twenty years after its building in 1861.
60Wharf and the steamer Idaho   View imagecirca 1880's
Written on page: The coal wharf and bunkers at west end of King Street in the 1880's. Steamer Idaho
61Ruins of a wharf following a fire   View imageJuly 1879
Written on page: Ruins of the fire of July 26, 1879, Seattle's greatest fire until 1889. Burned district about 350 feet square between Washington and Cherry streets west of Post-chiefly Yesler's wharf, mill and other properties. Loss, $100,000.
62Construction of the steamer Geo. E. Starr   View image1880
Written on page: Yesler wharf in 1880, from near Cherry Street. Steamer Geo. E. Starr being built in Hammond shipyard, about where Cherry and Post streets now are, or would be if Cherry were extended.
63Knights of Pythias in dress uniform   View image1880
Written on page: Knights of Pythias, under Captain W.E. Wilson, at First Avenue and Marion Street in 1880. W.G. Ronald, H.A. Bigelow, O.O. Denny, G.W. Boardman, W.V. Rinehart, and W.H. Hughes are among those in the parade.
64Steamer Eliza Anderson at the Yesler Wharf   View imagecirca 1884
Written on page: Steamer Eliza Anderson lying at Yesler Wharf about 1884. She was built in 1859, and was in Puget Sound service off and on for thirty years.
65View of Seattle from the Occidental Hotel   View imagecirca 1888-1889
Written on page: Seattle south of Yesler Ave. and west of Occidental in 1888-1889, before the fire, from Occidental Hotel. All was destroyed June 6, 1889."
66Memorial Service for President James A. Garfield   View image1881

Photographer: Asahel Curtis (22879)
Written on page: The President Garfield Memorial exercises at James and Yesler in October, 1881
There is some disagreement on when this memorial service actually took place. It is reported variously as occurring on September 26th, September 27th, or in October. However, all sources agree is that it took place in Occidental Square sometime in 1881.
See also page 54b in Album 1.
67Horse-drawn fire engine and firemen   View imageundated

Asahel Curtis (23272)
Written on page: Engine house and fire company on south side of Columbia Street between First and Second Avenues before the fire of June 6, 1889.
68First Avenue from Cherry Street to Pike   View image1879
69Post Building with the offices of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer   View imagecirca 1880-1890

Photographer: Asahel Curtis (23265)
Written on page: The finest house in Seattle when built, in 1881. This picture was taken some years later.
70Building on the west end of Cherry Street   View imagecirca 1880-1889

Asahel Curtis (23276)
Written on page: House erected by G. Poncin at west end of Cherry Street in the 1880s; destroyed in Seattle's great fire.
71Storefront for Golden Rule Bazaar   View imagecirca 1870-1880
Written on page: These two houses belonged to Carl Voss and L. Reining. They were at Marion Street and First Avenue; were burned June 6, 1889.
72Steamer Alida with the Territorial University and other buildings in the background   View image1870
Written on page: Seattle, north of Columbia Street in 1870. In the foreground are the Yesler mill sawlogs, The Alida was new, performing her first service that year. She is where Western Avenue is now. Public buildings shown are the University, and the then new Central School and Methodist Protestant Church. The large dwelling near the center was the Shoudy house on the northwest corner of Second Avenue and Marion Street.
Written on photo: 25117 C & M Seattle 1870
73Seattle from Fourth Avenue and Olive Street looking south   View image1870

Photographer: Peiser (21)
Written on page: Seattle in 1870, from Fourth Avenue and Seneca Street, looking south. The Baptist and Catholic Churches are to be seen; also Andrews, Atkins, Shorey, and other dwellings.
74Seattle from Fourth Avenue and Olive street, looking south east   View image1886

Photographer: Webster & Stevens (171x)
Written on photo: A view of Seattle in 1886, from Fourth Avenue and Olive Street, looking south and east. The Coppin water tower, Central School, Providence Hospital and University are shown on the far-away line.
75View from Seventh Avenue and James Street to the northwest   View image1888
Written on page: An 1888 view, from Seventh Avenue and James Street, to the northwest. Central School burned soon afterwards, is in the center. The showy dwelling was that of Joseph F McNaught. Columbia Street and Seventh Avenue are plainly exhibited.
76View from Seventh Avenue and Washington Street to the southeast   View imagecirca1880's
Written on page: A bit of Seattle seen in the middle 1880s from Seventh Avenue and Washington Street to the southeast. The big building in the center was the Catholic Academy of the Holy Names. It cost $50,000. Twenty years later, in a Jackson street regrade it and all these other houses were destroyed.
77Mr. and Mrs. Yesler outside their house   View imageJuly 4, 1887

Photographer: Webster & Stevens (152x)
Written on page: The Yesler dwelling on the fourth of July, 1887, Mr. and Mrs. Yesler standing at the James Street corner.
78Henry L. Yesler   View image1870

Photographer: Webster & Stevens (5117)
79Sarah B. Yesler, wife of Henry L. Yesler   View image1868
80blank
81Seattle fire ruins along Washington Street and Railroad Avenue   View imagecirca June 6, 1889

Photographer: Asahel Curtis (25155)
Written on page: This is a Seattle view from Washington Street and Railroad Avenue not long after the fire of June 6, 1889. The big house near the middle is the Boston, on Columbia and Second. The nearest wreckage was the Marshall building. Across Washington street from it is seen the D. Horton & Co. bank building.
82Angeline, daughter of Chief Seattle   View image1892

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: Angeline, daughter of Chief Seattle. Picture was taken in Madrona Park, in 1892, by John P. Soule. As far as known, she then took her first, and last perhaps, street car ride.
83Ruins of First Avenue southwest from Columbia and Second after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: This picture and 20 following pictures were taken by John P. Soule in the summer of 1889, after the great fire of June 6th. First Avenue southwest from Columbia and Second. The wrecks of buildings shown were in the what was the finest building block of the city of Seattle.
84Ruins of the Occidental Hotel after the Seattle fire.   View imageJune1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: Occidental Hotel, the James Street side, at First Avenue; the finest hotel in 1888-'89."
85Two men standing in front of the ruins of the Occidental Hotel following the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: The west end of the Occidental Hotel building.
86Ruins along Yesler Way, east from Post Street, after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: Yesler Way east from Post Street. The principal buildings shown are the Post, Yesler-Leary and Occidental on the left and the Colman on the right.
87Ruins along Yesler Way from Western Avenue after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
88Construction site in the ruins of the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: The walls standing were those of brick buildings on First Avenue, west side, between Yesler Way and Columbia Street.
89Ruins after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: Same locality as on opposite page; view from Second and Columbia
90Ruins along First Avenue, north of Yesler Way, after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: First Avenue, north of Yesler Way. Jacob Furth (with tall hat) and R. T.T. Minor are two of the four men standing on the Yesler Way corner.
91Men among the ruins of First Avenue south after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: First Avenue South, Yesler to Jackson. Houses on right are first D. Horton stone, and beyond Isaac Parker brock. On left furthest house is H.H. Dearborn's.
92The burned district north of Jackson Street after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
93Destroyed wharves, and ruins of Second Avenue and Columbia Street after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
94 John B. Denny of the Washington National Guard on duty in the ruins of the Dexter Horton bank building and Harrington & Smith grocery building after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: Dexter Horton bank building and a bit of the Harrington & Smith grocery building, on First avenue South and Washington Street.
95Ruins of the Oregon Improvement Company wharves after the Seattle fire   View imageJune 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: The Oregon Improvement Company wharves at Washington, Main and Jackson Streets.
96Tents and ruins southwest of Third and James after the Seattle fire   View imageJuly 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: Soutwest [sic] of Third and James in July, 1889.
97Store tents north of Marion Street after the Seattle fire   View imagecirca July 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: And this is the way it looked north of Marion Street.
98Store tents on Second Avenue, north of Madison Street after the Seattle fire   View imageAugust 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: Second Avenue north of Madison Street 60 days after the fire of June 6th, 1889
Some of the visible tent fronts are Lake Union Furniture Manufacturing Company, Durants Book Store, W. G. Gilger Watchmaker & Jeweler, and Drummers Headquarters
99Store tents on Second Avenue, north of Spring Street after the Seattle fire   View imageAugust 1889

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: Second Avenue north of Spring Street 60 days after the fire of June 6th, 1889
Some of the visible tent fronts are J.M Whiton Hardware, Doheny & Marum Dry Goods, and Arthur Letts Gents Furnishing Goods.
100-101bPanoramic view of Seattle taken from First Avenue and Pike Street   View image1894

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: On this page and the next is a view of Seattle in 1894, covering all the burned district of 1889. It was taken from First Avenue and Pike Street. The Armory, the Central School, Coppin water tower, Courthouse, Methodist Church, University building and Providence Hospital plainly shown. The "skyscraper" near the center is the six-story Burke building. The A.A. Denny home is also near the center, bounded by First and Second Avenues, University and Union streets. Second Avenue then as a business thoroughfare was not nearly equal to First.
102a-bView of Snoqualmie Falls   View image1892

Photographer: John P. Soule
Written on page: Snoqualmie Falls in original condition, as seen in 1892 by John P. Soule, photographer. Present day appearance is quite different.
103Residential portion of Port Madison seen from harbor   View image1880
Written on page: The residence portion of Port Madison in 1880. The Philip West Hotel on extreme left and Geo. A. Meig's home on extreme right are shown. Between them are the places occupied by the Bucklin, Bullene, Comstock, Primrose and other families.
104-105Port Blakely sawmill and ships in harbor   View image1887
106 Port Blakely and ships in harbor   View image1887
107The Hall Brothers Shipyard at Port Blakely   View image1887
108aPortrait of John Miller Murphy   View imagecirca 1911
Written on page: John Miller Murphy, born in 1839, came to Oregon 1850, began publishing the Washington Standard at Olympia 1860, and has published it continuously since, now fifty-one years--1911."
108bKitsap County Courthouse at Port Madisonpre 1912

Photographer: Mrs. A.E. Bowden
Written on page: Kitsap County Courthouse at Port Madison, destroyed in 1912. It was one of the oldest in Washington.
109blank page
110 Blackwell and Kelly Hotel   View imagecirca 1874
Written on page: The building shown herein was the hotel of Blackwell & Kelly, erected in 1873 by the Northern Pacific Co. at Tacoma. It stood on the first wharf, up the bay from the Tacoma Mill, when it stands today (1911). Telegraph, express, railroad and hotel offices were on first floor. The view is from the south. No other commercial enterprises were in that part of Tacoma's waterfront in 1873-74."
"These two views were sent to me by L.J. Hatch, who lived at New Tacoma in 1874. They are reprints, of course. T.W.P."
111Pacific Avenue and Sixth and Seventh Streets, Tacoma, Washington   View image1874
Written on page: This rough landscape was that presented in Tacoma in 1874, at Pacific Avenue and Sixth and Seventh Streets. The barn was Cogswell's and it stood where the Northern Pacific headquarters building now (1911) stands. The road leading to the railroad-steamer wharf is partially shown. This bit of town was called New Tacoma, to distinguish it from the other place two miles away that legally bore the name Tacoma.

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Last modified: November 04, 2010
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