Historical Background

Scope and Content

Restrictions on Access

Restrictions on Use

Custodial History

Acquisition Info

Processing Info

Inventory

Subject Terms


Victorian Theater Celebrities Woodburytype Album



PH Collection No.: 98
Title: Victorian Theater Celebrities Woodburytype Album
Date Span: circa 1875-1885
Quantity: 50 photographs (1 album) : Woodburytype prints
Location: Entire collection is available on digital site.
KV902 (1 box)
Languages: Collection materials are in English.
W.J. Florence, undated. Special Collections, UW Libraries, UW26445z




Historical Background

Walter Bentley Woodbury (1834-1885) patented his Woodburytype process in 1864, as a means of mass producing photographic prints to be used in book illustrations and magazines. Woodbury was able to develop a process using non-light-sensitive materials to produce highly detailed prints which appear very similar to silver based photographs, but that do not fade over time. The quality of the pictures was remarkable, with no grain, and the process was widely used until the turn of the century. The process was expensive and later replaced by other processes, such as photogravure, collotype, and offset lithography.

The process for making a Woodburytype print was first to spread a thick layer of light sensitized gelatin mixed with carbon pigment onto a glass sheet. A photograph negative was then laid over it and exposed to light. After the exposure, it was washed and the unhardened (unexposed) gelatin washed away. This left a thick layer of gelatin in the darker areas and a thinner layer in the lighter areas of the image. This was hardened and dried before being put in a press with a lead sheet, to produce a matching indentation in the lead. A translucent mixture of pigments suspended in warm gelatin was poured onto this relief surface and this pigment layer was then transferred onto paper. The thick and thin areas of gelatin, along with the white of the paper produce a wide range of tones. The thickness and translucency of the pigment layer provides a kind of color that a conventional flat deposit of ink cannot achieve.

During the Victorian period, the stage produced celebrities similar to movie stars today. Americans had more leisure time and better standards of living, and they looked to the theater to provide entertainment. The expanding transportation system in the United States allowed actors and actresses to tour the country, bringing professional theater to many towns and cities that had never before experienced it. As the population of the country grew, the number of theaters in large and mid-size cities grew as well. Strongly influenced by London theater, America inherited the "star system" from Great Britain. Stock theater companies were established in large cities on the East Coast and in New Orleans. The cast was then supplemented by visiting theatrical stars, who toured the country. Stock companies were self-sufficient and mounted productions on their own when no star was visiting, but by the 1840s, so many stars were touring the United States that most companies were rarely without the services of at least one well-known actor or actress. Some of the most famous performers were Ellen Terry, Edward Terry, and Marion Terry, W. H. Kendal and Madge Robertson Kendal, Lillie Langtry, Helena Modjeska, Lillian Adelaide Neilson, J. L. Toole, and Violet Cameron.

The presentation album includes the Woodburytype prints that were originally released in a monthly magazine titled The Theatre: A Monthly Review and Magazine published by Wyman & Sons, London. This magazine produced articles regarding dramatic criticism, reviews of theatrical performances from around Europe and updates as to where popular actors and actresses were and what productions or companies they were currently involved in. The Woodburytype prints appeared in a segment titled "Portraits" that focused on individual actors and actresses and included a brief biography of the performer, their past repertoire and theatrical reviews. The presentation album pages have gold frames to highlight the picture and the inscription that are from various volumes and series of this magazine.

Scope and Content

A presentation album containing 50 Woodburytype photographs and accompanying autographs of famous Victorian stage actors and actresses. The photographs were made in the late 1870s and early 1880s.

Restrictions on Access

Access to original photographs restricted. Permission of curator required for viewing. Contact Special Collections for more information.

Restrictions on Use

Restrictions may exist on reproduction, quotation, or publication. Contact Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries for details.

Custodial History

Originally donated to University of Washington School of Drama Library. Transferred to Special Collections at an unknown time.

Acquisition Info

Gift of John L. Scott

Processing Info

Processed by Laura Pasztor, 2005, and Megan Peacock, 2006; revised by Stefanie Terasaki, 2012.


Inventory

 
Album Item Date
11Marie Litton   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Inscribed below photo: Very truly yours. Marie Litton.
Marie Litton was an actress and theatre manager of St. James and Royal Court theatres in London.
 
2Violet Cameron also known as Violet Lydia Thompson   View imagecirca 1890s
Inscribed below photo: "I Miss My Turkey's "Glon Glon," "The Mascotte - Violet Cameron.
Violet Cameron (1862-1919) began her career as a child performer in 1871 and as an adult, performed in the British and American stage theatre.
 
3Marie Litton Robertson   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Inscribed below: Can one desire too much of a good thing? As You Like It
Marie Litton was an actress and theatre manager of St. James and Royal Court theatres in London. She married Wybrow Robertson.
 
4Ellen Terry   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Inscribed below: Come Merchant have you anything to say? Portia- Ellen Terry
Ellen Terry was a prominent Bristish Shakespearean stage actress. One of her most famous roles was Portia from the Merchant of Venice.
 
5Sarah Bernhardt   View imagecirca 1879
Sarah Bernhardt was a French stage and film actress known for her dramatic roles and acting.
Inscribed below: Brilliant
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre, No. 11, New Series. Photographed by Melandri, Paris.
 
6Howard Vernon   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Howard Vernon was a comedic actor who later turned to singing and performing in operettas.
Inscribed below: Very Truly Yours
 
7Francis Cowley Burnand   View imagecirca 1875-1885
A comedic playwright and author, Francis Burnand was an important contributor to the satirical magazine, Punch.
Inscribed below: [ill.] (greeting?) - F.C. Burnand
 
8Henry James Byron   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Henry James Byron was a British playwright, journalist and director.
Inscribed below: Yours Sincerely, Mr. Byron
 
9George Grossmith   View imagecirca 1879
George Grossmith was a comedian and actor as well as a composer of musical comedies.
Inscribed below: Yours Faithfully.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre, No.16, New Series. Photographed by Lock & Whitfield, London.
 
10William Hunter Kendal   View imagecirca 1875-1885
W.H. Kendal was a theater manager and comedic actor. He and his wife Madge Kendal often worked together.
Inscribed below: Thou art the last friend left me upon Earth. The Falcon. Count Federigo.
 
11 Sarah Bernhardt costumed as Doña Maira de Neubourg   View imagecirca 1879
Inscribed below: in Ruy Blas.
Signed as Mdlle. Bernhardt.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre, No. 11, New Series. Photographed by Melandri, Paris.
 
12Leonora Braham   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Leonora Braham was an opera singer and an actress.
Inscribed below: I can not tell what this love can be, That cometh to all but not to me. Patience.
 
13Ellen Terry   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Inscribed below: Yours Truly.
 
14Madge Robertson Kendalcirca 1875-1885
Madge Kendal was known for her acting in comedic and Shakespearian roles.
 
15Lillie Langtry   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Lillie Langtry was a stage actress and singer.
Inscribed below: Still as a barmaid.
 
16Fannie Leslie   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Inscribed below: Another notch to mark another day, Ah me! unlike this knife time cuts away. Robinson Crusoe.
 
17Fanny Mary Bernard-Beere   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Fanny Bernard-Beere was a stage actress.
Inscribed below: Trust me I could do much- Desdemona.
Signed as F. Bernard- Beere.
 
18Margaret Leighton   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Margaret Leighton, later Mrs. Margaret Alcott, was an actress.
Inscribed below: The lyfe so short, the craft so long to lerne, Th’essay so hard, so sharpe the conquering. Chaucer.
 
19 Lilian Adelaide Neilson   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Lilian Adelaide Neilson, also recognized as Adelaide Neilson, was an English stage actress who after many years of success in London moved to the American stage in 1872.
Inscribed below: Addio! Mio Caro.
 
20Henry Irving   View image1879
Henry Irving was a stage actor known for his style of managing a theater. He was the first actor to be knighted and worked often with actress Ellen Tracy.
Inscribed below: How like a fawning publican he looks! Shylock, 1879.
 
21Hermann Vezin   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Hermann Vezin was an American actor and speech teacher. He acted primarily on the British stage after moving to London.
Inscribed below: Yours Sincerely.
 
22Harry B. Conway (H.B. Conway)   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Inscribed below: Sincerely yr.
 
23Thomas Henry Gartside Neville   View imagecirca 1879
Henry Neville was an actor and theater manager and was well known for his roles in melodramas. He also opened an acting school circa 1878 and wrote a book on the theater.
Inscribed below: Truly yours.
Signed as Henry G. Neville.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No. 13, New Series. Photographed by Lock & Whitfield, London.
 
24William Rignold   View imagecirca 1879
William Rignold and brother George Rignold were famous for switching roles mid production due to their similar appearance and voice. William Rignold later traveled to Dublin where he would continue his acting career to much success. He returned to London where his eventual loss of sight would end his acting career.
Inscribed below: Yours Faithfully.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre, No. 17, New Series. Photographed by Lock & Whitfield, London.
 
25John T. Raymond also known as John O'Brien   View imagecirca 1875-1885
John T. Raymond was an American actor known for his comedic roles. Here he is pictured in costume for the role of Colonel Mulberry Sellers for a stage production of Mark Twain's Gilded Age circa 1874. He changed his name from John O'Brien to John T. Raymond in later years.
Inscribed below: There’s Millions in it. Col. Mulberry Sellers.
 
26Edward O'Connor Terry, Edward William Royce Reddall, Catherine Candelon, Nellie Farren   View imagecirca 1875-1885
These actors were working at the Gaiety Theatre in London starting in 1876. They were known for their comedic roles as well as their musical burlesque performances. Nellie Farren often played the young male role in such productions while the acting style of the others was known for its eccentricity.
Inscribed below: We are a merry family.
Signed as Edward Terry, E.W. Royce, Kate Vaughan and E. Farren.
 
27William Farren   View imagecirca 1875-1885
William Farren was a stage actor known for his roles as the old-man. His son William Farren would later be the father of Nellie Farren.
Inscribed below: Faithfully yours.
 
28Charles Warner   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Charles Warner was an actor who became popular after his acclaimed role in Drink in 1879.
Inscribed below: Yours Very Truly.
 
29Florence St. John costumed as Olivette   View imagecirca 1880
Florence St. John was a muscial burlesque and operetta singer.
Inscribed below: Indeed! and on whose testimony? Olivette. Yours very truly.
 
30Madge Robertson Kendal   View image1879
Inscribed below: My daily-fading Florio, it is thou hast set me this hard task. The Lady Giovianna. Madge Kendal 1879.
The inscription is from The Falcon by Alfred Tennyson.
 
31Geneviève Ward   View imagecirca 1879
Geneviève Ward was a operatic soprano and later a stage actress. In 1921 she became a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.
Inscribed below: There would be no place in creation for such women as I, if it were not for such men as you. Stephanie, Marquise de Mohrivart. Forget me not.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre, No. 4, Third Series. Photographed by Samuel A. Walker.
 
32Helena Modjeska   View imagecirca 1877
Helena Modjeska was an actress known for her roles in tragedies as well as for her Shakespearian roles. In 1876 she came the United States with her husband and debuted in San Francisco and New York in 1877 in Adrienne Lecouvreur by Ernest Legouvé.
Inscribed below: How good they are to like me so (Adrienne).
 
33Marion Terry   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Like her sister, Ellen Terry, Marion Terry was an actress. She performed in many performances including those written by Oscar Wilde.
Inscribed below: Yours Truly.
 
34Blanche Henri   View imagecirca 1879
Inscribed below: Yours very truly.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No. 14, New Series. Photographed by Lock & Whitfield, London.
 
35Richard Temple, Frank J. Thornton, James Durward Lely   View imagecirca 1881
Inscribed below: We are indeed jolly utter. Patience, or Bunthornes Bride.- Rich. Temple, Frank J. Thronton, Durward Lely.
The three actors are in their roles for the Opera Comique Patience or Bunthornes Bride by Gilbert and Sullivan. Richard Temple as the Colonel Calverley, Frank Thornton as Major Murgatroyd and Durward Lyall as the Duke.
 
36Lillian Adelaide Neilson   View image1879
Inscribed below: Yours Sincerely- Adelaide Neilson.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No.8, New Series. Photographed by Lock and Whitfield, London.
 
37Lottie Venne   View imagecirca 1879
Lottie Venne started her career at the Strand Theatre and was a musical burlesque performer who later took on more comedic roles.
Inscribed below: Yours Truly.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No.15, New Series. Photographed by Lock & Whitfield, London.
 
38Amy Roselle   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Amy Roselle was an actress known for her Shakespearian roles. She married Arthur Dacre and the two traveled together around Britian, Australia and the United States performing together in productions.
Inscribed below: Yours very truly.
 
39Bella Pateman   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Bella Pateman was married to Robert Pateman the comedic actor.
Inscribed below: Yours Truly.
 
40Emily Fowler   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Emily Fowler was an actress and theater manager who started her career in muscial burlesque.
Inscribed below: Very truly yours.
 
41John Lawrence Toole   View imagecirca 1879
Toole was a comedic actor and theater manager. He opened his own theater in 1879 and became the producer of its many performances.
Inscribed below: Yours very truly- J.L. Toole
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No.15, New Series. Photographed by T. (Thomas) Cranfield and Co., Dublin.
 
42Henry Irving   View imagecirca 1878
Inscribed below: Yours Sincerely.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No. 1, New Series. Photographed by Lock & Whitfield.
 
43John Lawrence Toole   View imagecirca 1880
Inscribed below: This is uppercrust indeed. Barnaby Doublechick. -J.L. Toole.
Here he is costumed as Barnaby Doublechick from Henry James Byron's comedy, The Upper Crust.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No.6, Third Series. London Stereoscopic Company (Photo & Woodburytype).
 
44William Hunter Kendal   View imagecirca 1878
Inscribed below with his signature, W.H. Kendal.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No. 2, New Series. Photographed by Lock & Whitfield, London.
 
45Charles Fechter as Hamlet   View imagecirca 1860-1870
Charles Fechter was a sculptor turned actor in 1846. In 1861 he took on the role of Hamlet that was met with mixed reviews. He made his first American appearance in New York in 1870. Circa 1874 Fechter married Lizzie Price even though he had a pre-existing marriage to a woman in London from 1847. Fechter died in 1875.
Inscribed below: Chas. Fechter.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre, No. 14, New Series. From a photograph by Boning & Small, Baker Street, London.
 
46Sir John Hare originally known as John Joseph Fairs   View imagecirca 1879
John Hare was a stage actor and theatre manager of the Garrick Theatre in London.
Inscribed below: You're drunk sir. Queen's shilling - Col Grant.
Hare is costumed as Colonel Grant from George William Godfrey's The Queen's Shilling.
 
47Edward O'Connor Terry   View imagecirca 1879
Edward Terry was both a comedic and dramatic actor. He is famous for his musical burlesques that he performed at the Gaiety Theatre in London and for opening his own theater in 1887.
Inscribed below: Yours Sincerely- Edward Terry.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No.6, New Series. Photographed by Lock & Whitfield, London.
 
48William Jermyn Florence   View imagecirca 1880s
W.J. Florence was an actor and playwright who originally performed his role as Hon. Bardwell Slote alongside his wife. He originally was named William Jermyn Conlin and changed his name to Florence. He is also known for his role in co-founding the Shriners.
Inscribed below: I am yours by a large majority. Mighty Dollar, Act 2.- W.J. Florence.
Here Florence is costumed as Honorary Bardwell Slote from Benjamin E. Woolf's play The Mighty Dollar.
 
49Violet Cameron also known as Violet Lydia Thompson   View imagecirca 1875-1885
Inscribed below: Sincerely Yours.
 
50Ellen Lancaster Wallace   View imagecirca 1879
Inscribed below: Very Truly.
Text not shown on front but found on another version: The Theatre No. 9, New Series.

Subject Terms

Subjects:
Actors--19th century--Autographs.
Actors--19th century--Photographs.
Actresses--19th century--Autographs.
Actresses--19th century--Photographs.
Woodburytype--Specimens.
Genre Headings:
Photographs.
Portrait Photographs.
Woodburytype.
Last modified: November 26, 2012
Contact Us