Washington International Law Journal

 

The Washington International Law Journal (ISSN 2377-0872) is published three times a year by students of the University of Washington School of Law. Address all correspondence to Washington International Law Journal, University of Washington School of Law, William H Gates Hall, Box 353020, Seattle WA, 98105-3020. Email: winlj@uw.edu; Facsimile (206)685-4457.

Recent Submissions

  • Washington International Law Journal; Williams-Hall, Vanessa (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2018-04)
  • Skahan, Kelly Ann (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2018-04)
    Abstract: Though ostensibly tasked with enforcing their respective nations’ campaign finance laws, the Federal Election Commission (“FEC”), Australian Electoral Commission (“AEC”), and Electoral Commission (“EC”) are ...
  • Calkins, Jennifer Devlin (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2018-04)
    Abstract: The Paris Agreement seeks to address the problem of climate change, a pressingly urgent issue, and one that is extraordinarily difficult to tackle. A primary mitigation mechanism is the requirement that member ...
  • Argyropoulou, Venetia (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2018-04)
    Venetia Argyropoulou, Lecturer, European University of Cyprus; PhD, Tilburg University. Abstract: This Article seeks to determine if there is a legal basis for European Union (“EU”) Institutions to be held accountable ...
  • Caldwell, Ernest (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2018-04)
    Ernest Caldwell, Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Laws of China and Taiwan, SOAS University of London. Abstract: The Republic of China on Taiwan (“Taiwan”) successfully and peacefully transitioned from authoritarian, ...
  • Ryan, Trevor; Bonython, Wendy (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2018-04)
    Trevor Ryan, Associate Professor, School of Law and Justice, Faculty of Business Government and Law, University of Canberra. Wendy Bonython, Associate Professor, School of Law and Justice, Faculty of Business Government ...
  • Desierto, Diane A. (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2018-04)
    Diane A. Desierto, Associate Professor (tenured) of Human Rights Law and Global Affairs, Keough School of Global Affairs with concurrent appointment at the Law School, University of Notre Dame; Professor of International ...
  • Feeley, Malcolm M. (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
  • Burrus, Jessica E. (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
    Abstract: In September of 2016, Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi was convicted in the International Criminal Court (“ICC”) for the intentional destruction of several World Heritage sites during the 2012 conflict in Timbuktu, Mali. ...
  • Wu, Tianyi (Tammy) (translator); Wang, Xiaoyang (translator) (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
    Abstract: The Supreme People’s Court of China began publishing its Annual Report on Intellectual Property Cases in 2008. The Annual Report summarizes intellectual property cases, such as patent, trademark, copyright, trade ...
  • Woo, Margaret Y.K. (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
    Abstract: In Court Reform on Trial: Why Simple Solutions Fail, Malcolm Feeley identified a number of obstacles that undermine reforms of the United States court system. Feeley’s proposed solution was to adopt a problem-oriented ...
  • Su, Kai-Ping (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
    Abstract: This Article examines the character of Taiwan’s criminal court system and proposed court reforms. Taiwan’s criminal court is a not-fragmented system, distinct from the fragmented American criminal court. In fact, ...
  • Park, Yong Chul (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
    Abstract: Since 2008, criminal jury trials have been implemented in South Korea with the Citizen Participation in Criminal Trials Act. Under the Act, defendants have the option to choose a jury trial over a bench trial, ...
  • Miyazawa, Setsuo; Hirayama, Mari (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
    Abstract: Malcolm M. Feeley examined cases of criminal justice reform in the United States, where reforms can be conceived and initiated in a very open structure, but implementation of the introduced reforms can be handed ...
  • Herber, Erik (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
    Abstract: In 2008, a victim participation system was introduced in Japan, which enabled crime victims to participate in criminal proceedings. One of the goals of the system was to correct the wrong done to victims due to ...
  • Wilson, Matthew J. (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
    Abstract: In Japan, the idea of citizen involvement in the judicial process has gained greater acceptance over the past decade. On May 21, 2009, Japan implemented its saiban’in seido or “lay judge system” as part of ...
  • Foote, Daniel H. (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
    Abstract: Japan has a career judiciary. The Courts Act of 1947 provides that judges may be appointed from among prosecutors, attorneys, and law professors. In practice, however, the vast majority of judges come from a ...
  • Miyazawa, Setsuo (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
  • Williams-Hall, Vanessa; Washington International Law Journal (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-12)
  • Foreword 
    Jones, Taryn (Washington International Law Journal Association, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, Washington, 2017-06)

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