Immigrant families' perceptions on walking to school and school breakfast: a focus group study

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Immigrant families' perceptions on walking to school and school breakfast: a focus group study

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dc.contributor.author Greves, H. Mollie en_US
dc.contributor.author Lozano, Paula en_US
dc.contributor.author Liu, Lenna en_US
dc.contributor.author Busby, Katie en_US
dc.contributor.author Cole, Jen en_US
dc.contributor.author Johnston, Brian en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-21T15:52:59Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-21T15:52:59Z
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Greves HM, Lozano P, Liu L, et al. Immigrant families' perceptions on walking to school and school breakfast: a focus group study. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. 2007;4(1):64. en_US
dc.identifier.other 10.1186/1479-5868-4-64 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ijbnpa.org/content/4/1/64 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1773/15750
dc.description.abstract Background: Immigrant children face an increased risk of being overweight. Little is known about how immigrant families perceive school programs that may help prevent obesity, such as walking to school and school breakfast. Methods: Six focus groups (n = 53) were conducted with immigrant parents of school-aged children, two each in three languages: Vietnamese, Spanish, and Somali. A facilitator and translator conducted the focus groups using a script and question guide. Written notes and audio transcripts were recorded in each group. Transcripts were coded for themes by two researchers and findings classified according to an ecological model. Results: Participants in each ethnic group held positive beliefs about the benefits of walking and eating breakfast. Barriers to walking to school included fear of children's safety due to stranger abductions, distrust of neighbors, and traffic, and feasibility barriers due to distance to schools, parent work constraints, and large families with multiple children. Barriers to school breakfast participation included concerns children would not eat due to lack of appealing/appropriate foods and missing breakfast due to late bus arrival or lack of reminders. Although some parents acknowledged concerns about child and adult obesity overall, obesity concerns did not seem personally relevant. Conclusion: Immigrant parents supported the ideals of walking to school and eating breakfast, but identified barriers to participation in school programs across domains of the ecological model, including community, institution, and built environment factors. Schools and communities serving immigrant families may need to address these barriers in order to engage parents and children in walking and breakfast programs. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Group Health Community Foundation (JC), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Injury Free Coalition for Kids Obesity Synergy Grant (KB), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) NRSA fellowship (MG). en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.title Immigrant families' perceptions on walking to school and school breakfast: a focus group study en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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