Two Salākkaphat Ceremonies. (1) at Wat Čôm Čāēng on Sept. 26, 1967. (2) at Wat Sitthimongkhon on Sept. 30, 1967

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Two Salākkaphat Ceremonies. (1) at Wat Čôm Čāēng on Sept. 26, 1967. (2) at Wat Sitthimongkhon on Sept. 30, 1967

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Title: Two Salākkaphat Ceremonies. (1) at Wat Čôm Čāēng on Sept. 26, 1967. (2) at Wat Sitthimongkhon on Sept. 30, 1967
Author: Keyes, Charles F.; ชารลส์ เอฟ. ไคส์
Abstract: "Thai transcript of tape recording and English translation of Salākkaphat Ceremony at Wat Čôm Čāēng; lay leader 'chanting' in formalized northern Thai; monk gives sermon; Truatnām chant, Thai style; Salākkaphat Ceremony at Wat Sitthimongkhon; Khaen music; young monk gives sermon; abbot explains ceremony; blessing given. From Field notebooks, Sept. 26, 1967, regarding the Wat Čôm Čāēng ceremony: ""Some chanting had been going on when we arrived but I was too disoriented to get it recorded. However, once back in the center, I started recording in the midst of a layman's chant of presentation of the gifts. This was done in formalized northern Thai. This was followed by another person (monk?) whom I could not see because he was sitting behind a post. He was also chanting in formal northern Thai. During this chant a layman took a bāt or monk's alms bowl and filled it with slips on which numbers were written. These numbers corresponded to the numbers attached to each offering. The bāt was passed to each monk and novice who selected a slip (čap salāk (จับสลาก). One monk then followed around with a notebook and wrote the name of the monk, his wat, and the number he selected. After all the monks and novices had selected their numbers several lay leaders also took numbers. During the course of the ceremony firecrackers were set off. When the chanting ended, chimes were struck. Then the monks chanted their official acceptance of the offering. This chant was in the northern Thai form (suat kammuang). This was followed by a chant by the chief layman in formalized northern Thai. Then there was a short introductory suat by the chief monk and then the truat nām in Thai style chanting by all the monks."" From Sept. 30, 1967: ""When we arrived, people were bringing the salāk gifts into the wihān (this wait has no bōt). Monks were still gathering in the kuthi and children were playing around the wat grounds. In the kuthi a police Capt. Soem Waidī (นายร้อยตำรวจเอกเสริมไหวดี) was playing central Thai music on an instrument something like a sitar called a khīm (ขีม). Mr. Soem said that the instrument was of Chinese origin and that the wood of the instrument also came from China. Below the kuthi children were playing with long drums and gongs [recorded both music, especially that of the khīm]."" ... ""During the preparations in the beginning part of the services a layman passed through the congregation making notes on who came to make merit and what the gifts were. The ceremony proper was as follows. 1. The abbot from Wat Čôm Čāēng led the congregation in a responsive chant. 2. The chief layman chanted the formal opening. 3. The abbot of Wat Čôm Čāēng led the congregation in the Namo, etc. 4. The layman then made the formal presentation of the offerings. Where as before he had been seated facing the monks, he now faced the Buddha images. He read first from a khôi manuscript and then from a sheet of paper. His presentation was done in formal northern Thai used in religious services. 5. A young monk took the sermon chair and the lay reader moved to sit in front of him. The lay reader requested a sermon. The monk gave a sermon in Central Thai. Although he held a palm-leaf manuscript, he did not read from it, but recited instead from memory. As he said during the sermon this was his first sermon. His nervousness certainly showed it. 6. The abbot of Wat Sithimongkhon took the sermon chair, but did not give a sermon (nor did he sit in the preaching position, rather he sat as a Westerner might with his feet on the ground). He gave a brief description of the ceremony and thanked people, including ourselves, for attending. 7. The monks chanted the formal gratitude. 8. The monks chanted the truatnām. The layman began to call out the numbers of the gifts and the monks and wats to whom they should be given (the monks had chosen their salāk in the kuthi). As each offering was called out it was set in front of the monk – recipient and the donor sat in front of him to receive the blessing. As the monk gave the blessing he would pour water into a container similar in manner to the pouring of water in the truatnām. Once all the offerings had been distributed the ceremony was over. [I recorded all of the ceremony except parts 7 and 8 which I was unable to record because the batteries had given out and had to be changed.]"""
Description: "Thai transcript of tape recording and English translation of Salākkaphat Ceremony at Wat Čôm Čāēng; lay leader 'chanting' in formalized northern Thai; monk gives sermon; Truatnām chant, Thai style; Salākkaphat Ceremony at Wat Sitthimongkhon; Khaen music; young monk gives sermon; abbot explains ceremony; blessing given. From Field notebooks, Sept. 26, 1967, regarding the Wat Čôm Čāēng ceremony: ""Some chanting had been going on when we arrived but I was too disoriented to get it recorded. However, once back in the center, I started recording in the midst of a layman's chant of presentation of the gifts. This was done in formalized northern Thai. This was followed by another person (monk?) whom I could not see because he was sitting behind a post. He was also chanting in formal northern Thai. During this chant a layman took a bāt or monk's alms bowl and filled it with slips on which numbers were written. These numbers corresponded to the numbers attached to each offering. The bāt was passed to each monk and novice who selected a slip (čap salāk (จับสลาก). One monk then followed around with a notebook and wrote the name of the monk, his wat, and the number he selected. After all the monks and novices had selected their numbers several lay leaders also took numbers. During the course of the ceremony firecrackers were set off. When the chanting ended, chimes were struck. Then the monks chanted their official acceptance of the offering. This chant was in the northern Thai form (suat kammuang). This was followed by a chant by the chief layman in formalized northern Thai. Then there was a short introductory suat by the chief monk and then the truat nām in Thai style chanting by all the monks."" From Sept. 30, 1967: ""When we arrived, people were bringing the salāk gifts into the wihān (this wait has no bōt). Monks were still gathering in the kuthi and children were playing around the wat grounds. In the kuthi a police Capt. Soem Waidī (นายร้อยตำรวจเอกเสริมไหวดี) was playing central Thai music on an instrument something like a sitar called a khīm (ขีม). Mr. Soem said that the instrument was of Chinese origin and that the wood of the instrument also came from China. Below the kuthi children were playing with long drums and gongs [recorded both music, especially that of the khīm]."" ... ""During the preparations in the beginning part of the services a layman passed through the congregation making notes on who came to make merit and what the gifts were. The ceremony proper was as follows. 1. The abbot from Wat Čôm Čāēng led the congregation in a responsive chant. 2. The chief layman chanted the formal opening. 3. The abbot of Wat Čôm Čāēng led the congregation in the Namo, etc. 4. The layman then made the formal presentation of the offerings. Where as before he had been seated facing the monks, he now faced the Buddha images. He read first from a khôi manuscript and then from a sheet of paper. His presentation was done in formal northern Thai used in religious services. 5. A young monk took the sermon chair and the lay reader moved to sit in front of him. The lay reader requested a sermon. The monk gave a sermon in Central Thai. Although he held a palm-leaf manuscript, he did not read from it, but recited instead from memory. As he said during the sermon this was his first sermon. His nervousness certainly showed it. 6. The abbot of Wat Sithimongkhon took the sermon chair, but did not give a sermon (nor did he sit in the preaching position, rather he sat as a Westerner might with his feet on the ground). He gave a brief description of the ceremony and thanked people, including ourselves, for attending. 7. The monks chanted the formal gratitude. 8. The monks chanted the truatnām. The layman began to call out the numbers of the gifts and the monks and wats to whom they should be given (the monks had chosen their salāk in the kuthi). As each offering was called out it was set in front of the monk – recipient and the donor sat in front of him to receive the blessing. As the monk gave the blessing he would pour water into a container similar in manner to the pouring of water in the truatnām. Once all the offerings had been distributed the ceremony was over. [I recorded all of the ceremony except parts 7 and 8 which I was unable to record because the batteries had given out and had to be changed.]"""
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/19597

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