Design and development of surface plasmon resonance imaging microfluidic assays

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Design and development of surface plasmon resonance imaging microfluidic assays

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Title: Design and development of surface plasmon resonance imaging microfluidic assays
Author: Foley, Jennifer Olivia
Abstract: This dissertation focuses on the design and development of SPR-imaging microfluidic assays to quantify nanomolar concentrations of small molecules (cortisol and phenytoin) in saliva for a point-of-care medical diagnostic. Microcontact printing, as a method to immobilize proteins on gold surfaces, was characterized with SPR-imaging, XPS, and XPS-imaging. Computational models of a standard microfluidic flow assay, an indirect immunoassay, and the concentration gradient immunoassay were developed to achieve a deeper understanding of the mass transport of analytes within a microchannel as well as to explore methods to improve the sensitivity of a microfluidic flow assay. The models showed strong qualitative agreement with experimental results. A microfluidic mixer---the herringbone channel---was incorporated in a microfluidic assay. The surface binding profile of a protein was significantly altered with this geometry. The surface binding profile was confirmed with SPR-imaging experiments. The model did not indicate an increase in the rate of binding of the protein to the surface of the herringbone microchannel when compared to a straight microchannel. Experimentally, at distances further downstream than that explored by the computational model, there was a modest increase in the rate of binding of the protein to the surface, suggesting that the herringbone geometry requires longer distances to significantly increase the rate of binding of a protein to a surface.
Description: Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2007.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/7982
Author requested restriction: Manuscript available on the University of Washington campuses and via UW NetID. Full text may be available via ProQuest's Dissertations and Theses Full Text database or through your local library's interlibrary loan service.

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