Biotech and Biomaterials Research to Reduce the Caries Epidemic

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Biotech and Biomaterials Research to Reduce the Caries Epidemic

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dc.contributor.author Slayton, Rebecca L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Bryers, James D. en_US
dc.contributor.author Milgrom, Peter en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-21T15:47:50Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-21T15:47:50Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Slayton R, Bryers J, Milgrom P. Biotech and Biomaterials Research to Reduce the Caries Epidemic. BMC Oral Health. 2006;6(Suppl 1):S1. en_US
dc.identifier.other 10.1186/1472-6831-6-S1-S1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6831/6/S1/S1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1773/15711
dc.description.abstract The goal of this workshop is to develop a consensus within the biomaterials/bioengineering community for a research agenda focused on creating technologies that will address the current dental caries pandemic. The workshop will bring together expertise from academia, industry, and the NIH institutes in the areas of oral biofilm microbiology and innovative biomaterials. The rationale for the workshop is that science and technology have not produced sufficient practical tools for public health practitioners and the private delivery system to address the pandemic in dental caries that exists for children and adults from families with low incomes and for numerous ethnic minority and racial groups. Moreover, it is unclear whether the barriers are remediable bioengineering and technical problems or fundamental science questions. Nevertheless, the obligation to address the gap between scientific research and practical application is especially relevant today. The U.S. and state governments bear the majority of the cost of trying to control this pandemic through Medicaid, the Public Health Service, Indian Health Service and other similar programs. These costs continue to escalate as continued applications of existing technology are unlikely to markedly reduce disparities. The mainstays of caries prevention, topical and systemic fluorides and pit and fissure sealants, are technologies developed in the 1950s and 1960s. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This conference was supported by NIH/NIDCR grant R13DE015798-01 and by the Whitaker Foundation. Additional financial support was provided by generous donations from Danisco Sweeteners, Colgate-Palmolive Co., and Kerr Corporation. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.title Biotech and Biomaterials Research to Reduce the Caries Epidemic en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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