Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCiechanowski, Paul S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWorley, Linda LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorRusso, Joan E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaton, Wayne J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-21T15:49:32Z
dc.date.available2010-04-21T15:49:32Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationCiechanowski P, Worley L, Russo J, Katon W. Using relationship styles based on attachment theory to improve understanding of specialty choice in medicine. BMC Medical Education. 2006;6(1):3.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1186/1472-6920-6-3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6920/6/3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/15724
dc.description.abstractBackground: Patient-provider relationships in primary care are characterized by greater continuity and depth than in non-primary care specialties. We hypothesized that relationship styles of medical students based on attachment theory are associated with specialty choice factors and that such factors will mediate the association between relationship style and ultimately matching in a primary care specialty. Methods: We determined the relationship styles, demographic characteristics and resident specialty match of 106 fourth-year medical students. We assessed the associations between 1) relationship style and specialty choice factors; 2) specialty choice factors and specialty match, and 3) relationship style and specialty match. We also conducted mediation analyses to determine if factors examined in a specialty choice questionnaire mediate the association between relationship style and ultimately matching in a primary care specialty. Results: Prevalence of attachment styles was similar to that found in the general population and other medical school settings with 59% of students rating themselves as having a secure relationship style. Patient centeredness was directly associated, and career rewards inversely associated with matching in a primary care specialty. Students with a self-reliant relationship style were significantly more likely to match in a non-primary care specialty as compared to students with secure relationship style (OR = 5.3, 95% CI 1.8, 15.6). There was full mediation of the association between relationship style and specialty match by the specialty choice factor characterized by patient centeredness. Conclusion: Assessing relationship styles based on attachment theory may be a potentially useful way to improve understanding and counsel medical students about specialty choice.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSupported by grant K23 DK60652-01 (National Institute of Digestive and Diabetes and Kidney Diseases).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUsing relationship styles based on attachment theory to improve understanding of specialty choice in medicineen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record