Managed care and patient ratings of the quality of specialty care among patients with pain or depressive symptoms

ResearchWorks/Manakin Repository

Search ResearchWorks


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics

Related Information

Managed care and patient ratings of the quality of specialty care among patients with pain or depressive symptoms

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Grembowski, David en_US
dc.contributor.author Paschane, David en_US
dc.contributor.author Diehr, Paula en_US
dc.contributor.author Katon, Wayne en_US
dc.contributor.author Martin, Diane en_US
dc.contributor.author Patrick, Donald L. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-21T15:52:44Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-21T15:52:44Z
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Grembowski D, Paschane D, Diehr P, et al. Managed care and patient ratings of the quality of specialty care among patients with pain or depressive symptoms. BMC Health Services Research. 2007;7(1):22. en_US
dc.identifier.other 10.1186/1472-6963-7-22 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6963/7/22 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1773/15748
dc.description.abstract Background: Managed care efforts to regulate access to specialists and reduce costs may lower quality of care. Few studies have examined whether managed care is associated with patient perceptions of the quality of care provided by physician and non-physician specialists. Aim is to determine whether associations exist between managed care controls and patient ratings of the quality of specialty care among primary care patients with pain and depressive symptoms who received specialty care for those conditions. Methods: A prospective cohort study design was conducted in the offices of 261 primary physicians in private practice in Seattle in 1997. Patients (N = 17,187) were screened in waiting rooms, yielding a sample of 1,514 patients with pain only, 575 patients with depressive symptoms only, and 761 patients with pain and depressive symptoms. Patients (n = 1,995) completed a 6-month follow-up survey. Of these, 691 patients received specialty care for pain, and 356 patients saw mental health specialists. For each patient, managed care was measured by the intensity of managed care controls in the patient's health plan and primary care office. Quality of specialty care at follow-up was measured by patient rating of care provided by the specialists. Outcomes were pain interference and bothersomeness, Symptom Checklist for Depression, and restricted activity days. Results: The intensity of managed care controls in health plans and primary care offices was generally not associated with patient ratings of the quality of specialty care. However, pain patients in more-managed primary care offices had lower ratings of the quality of specialty care from physician specialists and ancillary providers. Conclusion: For primary care patients with pain or depressive symptoms and who see specialists, managed care controls may influence ratings of specialty care for patients with pain but not patients with depressive symptoms. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Grant No. HS06833 and No. HS11712. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.title Managed care and patient ratings of the quality of specialty care among patients with pain or depressive symptoms en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View
1472-6963-7-22.pdf 280.9Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record