Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorThieme, Katien_US
dc.contributor.authorFlor, Hertaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTurk, Dennis C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-06T20:08:40Z
dc.date.available2010-05-06T20:08:40Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationThieme K, Flor H, Turk D. Psychological pain treatment in fibromyalgia syndrome: efficacy of operant behavioural and cognitive behavioural treatments. Arthritis Research and Therapy. 2006;8(4):R121.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1186/ar2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://arthritis-research.com/content/8/4/R121en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/15868
dc.description.abstractThe present study focused on the evaluation of the effects of operant behavioural (OBT) and cognitive behavioural (CBT) treatments for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). One hundred and twenty-five patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for FMS were randomly assigned to OBT (n = 43), CBT (n = 42), or an attention-placebo (AP) treatment (n = 40) that consisted of discussions of FMS-related problems. Assessments of physical functioning, pain, affective distress, and cognitive and behavioural variables were performed pretreatment and post-treatment as well as 6 and 12 months posttreatment. Patients receiving the OBT or CBT reported a significant reduction in pain intensity post-treatment (all Fs > 3.89, all Ps less than 0.01). In addition, the CBT group reported statistically significant improvements in cognitive (all Fs > 7.95, all P less than 0.01) and affective variables (all Fs graeater than 2.99, all Ps less than 0.02), and the OBT group demonstrated statistically significant improvements in physical functioning and behavioural variables (all Fs greater than 5.99, all Ps less than 0.001) compared with AP. The AP group reported no significant improvement but actually deterioration in the outcome variables. The post-treatment effects for the OBT and CBT groups were maintained at both the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. These results suggest that both OBT and CBT are effective in treating patients with FMS with some differences in the outcome measures specifically targeted by the individual treatments compared with an unstructured discussion group. The AP group showed that unstructured discussion of FMSrelated problems may be detrimental.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGrants from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft to KT (Th 899-1/2 and 899-2/2) and HF (FL 156/26), the Max-Planck Award for International Cooperation to HF, and the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Arthritis.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePsychological pain treatment in fibromyalgia syndrome: efficacy of operant behavioural and cognitive behavioural treatmentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record