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dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Kelsey
dc.contributor.authorBryan, John
dc.contributor.authorChahary, Monica
dc.contributor.authorChoe, Jeung Hwa (Victoria)
dc.contributor.authorCouser, Griffith
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Kitty (Makivik Corporation)
dc.contributor.authorGrosman, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorHalliday, Scott
dc.contributor.authorHamed, Zeina
dc.contributor.authorHerke, Ahnalee
dc.contributor.authorHruska, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Colleen
dc.contributor.authorKoperqualuk, Lisa (Makivik Corporation)
dc.contributor.authorMaltais, Dominic
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Kelly
dc.contributor.authorSelling, Kim
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-19T20:24:29Z
dc.date.available2011-04-19T20:24:29Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/16482
dc.descriptionCreated as part of the 2011 Jackson School for International Studies SIS 495: Task Force. Vincent Gallucci and Nadine Fabbi Task Force Advisors; Julia Gourley, Evaluator; Jeung Hwa (Victoria) Choe, Coordinator.en_US
dc.description.abstractGlobal warming has triggered fundamental ecological changes to the Arctic landscape. As the sea ice melts, greater access to lucrative natural resources and new shipping lanes is intensifying economic and political interest in the region. Ownership and control over these resources has spurred debate at international, regional, national, and sub-national levels. State and non-state actors are seeking to position themselves to exploit these resources and benefit economically. If left unchecked, unsustainable resource extraction has the potential to seriously degrade the natural environment and threaten the human security of Arctic inhabitants. Existing governance frameworks in the Arctic require reassessment and alteration in light of these recent changes.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMelting Boundaries: Rethinking Arctic Governanceen_US


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