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dc.contributor.authorKeil, Rick
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-02T22:26:23Z
dc.date.available2011-06-02T22:26:23Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/16562
dc.description.abstractKeil will describe his research measuring spices in Puget Sound. Puget Sound sees seasonal inputs of specific spices, such as vanilla, cinnamon, and thyme. Essentially, what we eat winds up in Puget Sound. Spices can be smelled by salmon and are present at concentrations higher than the 'natural' compounds flavoring the Sound.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Washington Water Centeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries2008 Annual Review of Research;Keil
dc.subjectspicesen_US
dc.subjectcinnamonen_US
dc.subjectthymeen_US
dc.subjectVanilla (Orchidaceae)en_US
dc.subjectwatershedsen_US
dc.subjectsewage effluenten_US
dc.subjectsewage treatmenten_US
dc.subjectSalmonidaeen_US
dc.subjectwateren_US
dc.subjectsamplingen_US
dc.subjectseasonal variationen_US
dc.titleSpices in Puget Sound and in Seattle's Sewage Effluenten_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.typeRecording, oralen_US


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