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Aerobic Exercise Improves Cognition for Older Adults with Glucose Intolerance, A Risk Factor for Alzheimer’s Disease

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dc.contributor.author Baker, Laura D.
dc.contributor.author Frank, Laura L.
dc.contributor.author Foster-Schubert, Karen
dc.contributor.author Green, Pattie S.
dc.contributor.author Wilkinson, Charles W.
dc.contributor.author McTiernan, Anne
dc.contributor.author Cholerton, Brenna A.
dc.contributor.author Plymate, Stephen R.
dc.contributor.author Fishel, Mark A.
dc.contributor.author Watson, G. Stennis
dc.contributor.author Duncan, Glen E.
dc.contributor.author Mehta, Pankaj D.
dc.contributor.author Craft, Suzanne
dc.date.accessioned 2011-11-07T21:18:12Z
dc.date.available 2011-11-07T21:18:12Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation J Alzheimers Dis. 2010 ; 22(2): 569–579. doi:10.3233/JAD-2010-100768. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1773/18741
dc.description.abstract Impaired glucose regulation is a defining characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) pathology and has been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Although the benefits of aerobic exercise for physical health are well-documented, exercise effects on cognition have not been examined for older adults with poor glucose regulation associated with prediabetes and early T2DM. Using a randomized controlled design, twenty-eight adults (57–83 y old) meeting 2-h tolerance test criteria for glucose intolerance completed 6 months of aerobic exercise or stretching, which served as the control. The primary cognitive outcomes included measures of executive function (Trails B, Task Switching, Stroop, Self-ordered Pointing Test, and Verbal Fluency). Other outcomes included memory performance (Story Recall, List Learning), measures of cardiorespiratory fitness obtained via maximal-graded exercise treadmill test, glucose disposal during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, body fat, and fasting plasma levels of insulin, cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, amyloid-β (Aβ40 and Aβ42). Six months of aerobic exercise improved executive function (MANCOVA, p = 0.04), cardiorespiratory fitness (MANOVA, p = 0.03), and insulin sensitivity (p = 0.05). Across all subjects, 6-month changes in cardiorespiratory fitness and insulin sensitivity were positively correlated (p = 0.01). For Aβ42, plasma levels tended to decrease for the aerobic group relative to controls (p = 0.07). The results of our study using rigorous controlled methodology suggest a cognition-enhancing effect of aerobic exercise for older glucose intolerant adults. Although replication in a larger sample is needed, our findings potentially have important therapeutic implications for a growing number of adults at increased risk of cognitive decline. en_US
dc.publisher JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE en_US
dc.subject Aerobic exercise; Alzheimer’s disease; cognition; dementia; diabetes; executive function; glucose intolerance; prediabetes en_US
dc.title Aerobic Exercise Improves Cognition for Older Adults with Glucose Intolerance, A Risk Factor for Alzheimer’s Disease en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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