Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBonning, Brittany
dc.contributor.authorCherny, Igor
dc.contributor.authorDeMartino, Ellie
dc.contributor.authorErickson, Alicia
dc.contributor.authorGebhart, Genevieve
dc.contributor.authorIsaacson, Mara
dc.contributor.authorLee, Wing Chung (Alex)
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Laura
dc.contributor.authorPace, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorRock, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorSu, Martin
dc.contributor.authorTeagarden, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorWong, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorYip, Hiu Yan (Jessica)
dc.contributor.authorYonev, Dean
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-15T20:33:27Z
dc.date.available2012-03-15T20:33:27Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/19670
dc.descriptionCreated as part of the 2012 Jackson School for International Studies SIS 495: Task force. Scott Montgomery Task Force Advisor; Mikkal Herberg Evaluator; Lauren Pace Coordinator.en_US
dc.description.abstractFor nearly two thousand years, oil and gas have flowed in the imaginations of those who have come to the Caspian Sea region. When Marco Polo traveled the Silk Road to the city of Baku in 1264, he found “a fountain from which oil springs in vast abundance,” volcanoes of mud built by seeps of natural gas, and a flaming hill where burned the “eternal fire” of Absheron.1 By the time the Nobel brothers arrived from Sweden in the 1870s to establish one of the great early petroleum companies, Baku had become the largest center of oil production in the world.en_US
dc.titleTreasures of the Caspian: The Coming Struggle for Energy East and Westen_US
dc.title.alternativeVolume 176: Treasures of the Caspian: The Coming Struggle for Energy East and West


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record