ResearchWorks Archive

Browsing Biology, Department of by Issue Date

Browsing Biology, Department of by Issue Date

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  • Huey, Raymond B. (American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1974-05-31)
    The Puerto Rican lizard Anolis cristatellus behaviorally regulates body temperature in an open habitat but passively tolerates lower and more variable temperatures in an adjacent forest where basking sites are few and ...
  • Huey, Raymond B. (The University of Chicago, 1978-01)
    Moving up or down a mountain from a given site, one encounters faunas that differ by varying degrees. The elevational separation between sites obviously influences the magnitude of that difference (faunal similarity is ...
  • Huey, Raymond B.; Pianka, Eric R. (Ecological Society of America, 1981-08)
    Desert lizards are typically either widely foraging or sit-and-wait predators, and these foraging modes are correlated with major differences in ecology. Foraging mode is related to the type of prey eaten by lizards. Widely ...
  • Huey, Raymond B.; Peterson, Charles R.; Arnold, Stevan J.; Porter, Warren P. (Ecological Society of America, 1989-08)
    Studies of behavioral thermoregulation of ectotherms have typically focused only on active animals. However, most temperate-zone ectotherms actually spend more time sequestered in retreats (e.g., under rocks) than active ...
  • Hertz, Paul E.; Huey, Raymond B.; Stevenson, R. D. (University of Chicago, 1993-11)
    We describe a research protocol for evaluating temperature regulation from data on small field-active ectothermic animals, especially lizards. The protocol requires data on body temperatures (Tb) of field-active ectotherms, ...
  • Haig, David; Bergstrom, Carl T. (Blackwell Publishing LTD, 1995)
    Most discussions of "sperm competition" have ignored the potential for competition among the different sperm genotypes present in the ejaculate of a single male. Rivalry within ejaculates may limit cooperation among the ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; Lachmann, Michael (The Royal Society, 1997)
    Zahavi's handicap principle, originally proposed as an explanation for sexual selection of elaborate male traits (Zahavi, 1975) suggests that signalling can be honest if less desirable signallers must pay a higher cost in ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; Lachmann, Michael (Academic Press INC Elsevier Science, 1998)
    Models of costly signalling are commonly employed in evolutionary biology in order to explain how honest communication between individuals with conflicting interests can be stable. These models have focused primarily on a ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; Godfrey-Smith, Peter (Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1998)
    A wide range of ecological and evolutionary models predict variety in phenotype or behavior when a population is at equilibrium. This heterogeneity can be realized in different ways. For example, it can be realized through ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; Lachmann, Michael (National Academy of Sciences, 1998-04)
    The Sir Philip Sidney game has been used by numerous authors to show how signal cost can facilitate honest signaling among relatives. Here, we demonstrate that, in this game, honest cost-free signals are possible as well, ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; Pritchard, Jonathan K. (Genetics, 1998-08)
    Several features of the biology of mitochondria suggest that mitochondria might be susceptible to Muller’s ratchet and other forms of evolutionary degradation: Mitochondria have predominantly uniparental inheritance, appear ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; Bergstrom, Theodore C. (Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999)
    The theory of parent-offspring conflict predicts that mothers and their offspring may not agree about how resources should be allocated among family members. An offspring, for example, may favor a later weaning date than ...
  • Robson, Arthur J.; Bergstrom, Carl T.; Pritchard, Jonathan K. (Academic Press LTD Elsevier Scientific LTD, 1999)
    Patterns of reproductive uncertainty can have an important influence on population dynamics. There is a crucial distinction between what we describe here as aggregate uncertainty (in which reproductive output in each ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; McElhany, Paul; Real, Leslie A. (National Academy of the Sciences, 1999-04)
    Transmission bottlenecks occur in pathogen populations when only a few individual pathogens are transmitted from one infected host to another in the initiation of a new infection. Transmission bottlenecks can dramatically ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; Real, Leslie A. (Evolutionary Ecology LTD, 2000)
    Theoretical models of mate choice and sexual selection typically make one of two simplifying assumptions. Either mate-preferences are assumed to be uniform (e.g., all females have the same preferences with respect to males), ...
  • Lipsitch, Marc; Bergstrom, Carl T.; Levin, Bruce R. (National Academy of Sciences, 2000-02-15)
    A simple mathematical model of bacterial transmission within a hospital was used to study the effects of measures to control nosocomial transmission of bacteria and reduce antimicrobial resistance in nosocomial pathogens. ...
  • Levin, Bruce R.; Bergstrom, Carl T. (National Academy of the Sciences, 2000-06-20)
    To some extent, the genetical theory of adaptive evolution in bacteria is a simple extension of that developed for sexually reproducing eukaryotes. In other, fundamental, ways the process of adaptive evolution in bacteria ...
  • Huey, Raymond B.; Eguskitza, Xavier (American Medical Association, 2000-07-12)
    The use of supplemental oxygen by Himalayan mountaineers has been debated for more than 8 decades. Although sometimes viewed as unsporting, supplemental-oxygen use may improve survival rates by increasing performance and ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; Lipsitch, Marc; Levin, Bruce R. (Genetics, 2000-08)
    Despite the near-ubiquity of plasmids in bacterial populations and the profound contribution of plasmid-borne genes and infectious gene transfer to the adaptation and evolution of bacteria, the mechanisms responsible for ...
  • Bergstrom, Carl T.; Lachmann, Michael (Academic Press LTD Elsevier Science LTD, 2001)
    Alarm-calling behavior is common in many species that suffer from predation. While kin selection or reciprocal altruism are typically invoked to explain such behaviors, several authors have conjectured that some alarm calls ...

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