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dc.contributor.authorOlmstead, Jason
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-20T19:08:48Z
dc.date.available2012-06-20T19:08:48Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/19845
dc.descriptionZoo-Bot Quarter, Spring 2011en_US
dc.description.abstractThe discovery that fossil fuels are not a sustainable fuel source has led to a search for alternatives. Many marine biologists hypothesize that the answer may lie in algae, more specifically in microalgae. The purpose of this pilot study is to provide baseline data for future research for biofuel production. Using cultures exposed to different temperatures and media containing different levels of nutrients, I found that Asterionellopsis glacialis was the best candidate among the algae tested from the Pacific Northwest to pursue for potential biofuel production in warmer climates. This was based on its tolerance to different nutrient levels and temperatures.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesZoo-Bot Quarter;Spring 2011
dc.subjectThalassiosiraen_US
dc.subjectChaetocerosen_US
dc.subjectlipid productionen_US
dc.titleA Pilot Study on Growth Rates of Asterionellopsis glacialis, Thalassiosira sp., and Chaetoceros sp. for Potential Biofuel Productionen_US


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