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dc.contributor.authorSinger, Amy
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-25T23:21:12Z
dc.date.available2012-06-25T23:21:12Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/19887
dc.description.abstractEast Sound and West Sound, Orcas Island WA, are two glacially cut fjords dominated by mud and silty/mud substrates (Endris et. al., 2010). Fine grained substrates are typically dominated by deposit feeding organisms, specifically polychaetes (Lenihan and Micheli, 2001). Estuaries, with influx of fine grained material and alteration of water chemistry, exhibit lower overall diversity (Constable, 1999). This study aims to evaluate differences in the infaunal macroinvertebrate communities in East and West Sound Orcas Island Washington State. A possible controlling factor on the communities within East Sound is a glacially deposited partial sill at the mouth that restricts flow and likely creates differing physical conditions from West Sound. This question is addressed by 1) collecting and characterizing the infaunal macroinvertebrates within East and West Sound. 2) Measuring physical parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, and grain size distribution. 3) Using multibeam backscatter data and in-situ sampling to delineate the boundaries between different communities in the two sounds.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSpatial Ecology of Salish Sea Benthos Research Apprenticeship;Fall 2011
dc.subjectOrcas Islanden_US
dc.subjectinfaunal macroinvertebratesen_US
dc.titleInfaunal Macroinvertebrate Diversity of East and West Sound Orcas Island: use of Multibeam and In-Situ sampling to characterize soft-sediment communitiesen_US


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