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dc.contributor.authorEngberg, Robert E.
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-19T20:36:51Z
dc.date.available2013-02-19T20:36:51Z
dc.date.issued1967
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/21142
dc.descriptionPaper manuscript originally submitted in 1967.en_US
dc.description.abstractIt will be pointed out in this paper that Fred Morrow Fling was a product of his times, and that his assumptions and attitudes toward history were in many ways those of the scientific historians. In discussing his career I have tried to do what Fling himself attempted to do in his biography of Mirabeau: "I have tried." Fling wrote, "to avoid the role of the advocate and to attain to a strictly scientific point of view -- in so far as evidence permits it -- but to describe it sympathetically." I cannot claim success in being "scientific" if by that term is meant strict objectivity. It will be clear that 1 do not share Fling's a belief that the historian can be completely detached from his subject. I will not, however, argue with Fling on whether history is or is not a science; he believed it was and it is my purpose to suggest why he thought so, and to explain what the science of history meant to Fling.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.titleFred Morrow Fling: Scientific Historianen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.termsManuscript available on the University of Washington campuses and via UW NetID. You may also request a copy through your local library's interlibrary loan service.en_US


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