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dc.contributor.advisorKlinger, Terrieen_US
dc.contributor.authorHauptfeld, Kathrin Simoneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-25T17:52:13Z
dc.date.available2013-07-25T17:52:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-07-25
dc.date.submitted2013en_US
dc.identifier.otherHauptfeld_washington_0250O_11921.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/23510
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2013en_US
dc.description.abstractThe resilience framework is increasingly used to understand the dynamics of sustainability in coupled social and ecological systems. Resilient ecological systems exhibit high levels of diversity, including species and habitat diversity, and redundancy, all of which are thought to help maintain the system within a domain of attraction. Numerous studies demonstrate the threat posed to natural systems by the introduction of invasive species on a global scale. Over the past century, biological invasion has caused changes in biological diversity and alterations to the structure and function of ecosystems. In Puget Sound, the non-native Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) has been used as a commercial aquaculture species for over a century, despite increasing evidence that its spread threatens ecological resilience of the nearshore system. Interestingly, recent changes in ocean conditions that lessen the invasion threat have been met with alarm in Washington, as they jeopardize the social resilience built on the culture of Pacific oysters. In this case study, I discuss conflicts between social and ecological resilience, and the values that drive those conflicts. I then discuss social adaptation strategies as options to retain social-ecological resilience within the system.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.subjectAquaculture; Crassostrea gigas; Puget Sound; Social-ecological resilienceen_US
dc.subject.otherNatural resource managementen_US
dc.subject.otherEcologyen_US
dc.subject.othermarine affairsen_US
dc.titleFrom Introduced to Invasive and Iconic: An aquaculture oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and social-ecological resilience in Puget Sounden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.termsNo embargoen_US


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