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dc.contributor.advisorRadnitz, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorPaulsen, Justinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-25T17:53:16Z
dc.date.available2013-07-25T17:53:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-07-25
dc.date.submitted2013en_US
dc.identifier.otherPaulsen_washington_0250O_11633.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/23539
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2013en_US
dc.description.abstractTwenty years after the fall of the Soviet Union, a significant portion of the Russian-speaking population in Latvia remain non-citizens, meaning they lack the right to vote or work in specific industries. This thesis attempts to provide insight into this unique situation by assessing potential labor market incentives to obtain citizenship. Using the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development's Life in Transition II dataset, I use the propensity score method to analyze differences between Russian-speaking citizens' and non-citizens' monthly consumption and long-term unemployment and find no statistically significant differences between the different groups. Governmental policies may contribute to this lack of economic differentiation despite the superior rights and opportunities citizens enjoy.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.subjectCitizenship; Labor market; Latvia; Russian-speaking populationen_US
dc.subject.otherEast European studiesen_US
dc.subject.otherEconomics, Laboren_US
dc.subject.otherPublic policyen_US
dc.subject.otherto be assigneden_US
dc.titleCitizenship in Latvia: Does it Pay?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.termsNo embargoen_US


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