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dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Ariel Mei
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-03T00:24:27Z
dc.date.available2014-01-03T00:24:27Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/24365
dc.descriptionSenior thesis written for Oceanography 445en_US
dc.description.abstract[author abstract] Global climate is heavily influenced by the hydrology of the tropical Pacific, which is characterized by a band of heavy precipitation at ~10°N in summer (~3°N in winter) known as the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Characterized by warm underlying sea surface temperatures and strong convection, the seasonal migrations of the Intertropical Convergence Zone alter the precipitation patterns of the tropical Pacific, as well as global climate. This study in Lake Escondida, Isabela Island, Galapagos, used the isotopic composition of aquatic and terrestrial biomarkers in sediments to reconstruct paleoclimates in the Galapagos. The results are consistent with previous studies, and also show evidence for a northern migration of the ITCZ after 1850 AD.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Washington School of Oceanographyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings from the University of Washington School of Oceanography Senior Thesis, Academic Year 2012-2013
dc.subjectPaleoclimatology -- Galapagos Islandsen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental chemistryen_US
dc.subjectHydrologyen_US
dc.titleEstablishing paleorecords in the galapagos using hydrogen isotope ratios as a proxy for climate changeen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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