Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBurstein, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorCesare, Ninaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-24T18:21:42Z
dc.date.available2014-02-24T18:21:42Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-24
dc.date.submitted2013en_US
dc.identifier.otherCesare_washington_0250O_12499.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/24986
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2013en_US
dc.description.abstractExisting literature suggests that online spaces may be less effective than face-to-face communication at promoting a sense of collective identification among social movement participants. These studies, however, do not take into consideration how this effect varies according to the online platform used. Furthermore, considerations of how online communication influences symbolic interpretations of the movement often do not empirically link these interpretations to differences in protest outcomes. Using data collected from Occupy Wall Street supporters, this study will explore the way in which mode of communication influences the degree to which movement participants are able to develop a sense of collective identification by analyzing how a.) reasons for participation and b.) engagement in high risk protest activities vary according to the mode of communication used by the participant to gather news about the movement. These outcomes are intended to help social scientists better understand how the use of technology that seems to lower the cost of communication between social movement supporters impacts symbolic motivations for participation and protest outcomes related to these symbolic interpretations.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.subjectCollective identification; Digital activism; Online; Social movementsen_US
dc.subject.otherSociologyen_US
dc.subject.othersociologyen_US
dc.titleCollective Identification, High Risk Protest, and Social Media Use in the Occupy Wall Street Movementen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.termsRestrict to UW for 5 years, then make Open Accessen_US
dc.embargo.lift2019-02-02


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record