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dc.contributor.advisorDhavan, Purnimaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeadows, Monicaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-24T18:23:20Z
dc.date.available2014-02-24T18:23:20Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-24
dc.date.submitted2013en_US
dc.identifier.otherMeadows_washington_0250E_12667.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/25018
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--University of Washington, 2013en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I analyze the role the horse and horse culture played in early modern South Asia through the lens of the genre of horse treatises (<italic>farasnama</italic>) produced in the Subcontinent in Persian. My analysis of the <italic>farasnama</italic> ties in directly with the new analyses of the Mughal Empire as a dynamic imperial formation fueled by the upward mobility of peasant and pastoral groups working together with elite groups in Indian society who had command over complex economic and bureaucratic systems. The horse trade moved through these systems, supporting and extending the cultural norms on which these relationships were based. Even without crunching the numbers of the astonishing economic and political scale of this trade, one begins to get a sense of how truly extensive the cultural systems were that supported it, and how critical these same cultural systems were to maintaining the political power of the warrior elite.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.subjectHorse; Horse Treatise; Mughals; South Asian History; Tradeen_US
dc.subject.otherSouth Asian studiesen_US
dc.subject.otherIslamic cultureen_US
dc.subject.otherMiddle Eastern studiesen_US
dc.subject.otherhistoryen_US
dc.titleThe Horse: Conspicuous Consumption of Embodied Masculinity in South Asia, 1600-1850en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.termsNo embargoen_US


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