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dc.contributor.authorSato, Kirk N.
dc.contributor.authorRobin, Elahi
dc.contributor.authorKapsenberg, Lydia
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Jennifer C.
dc.contributor.authorPietsch, Carlie
dc.contributor.authorVaughn, Chelsea R.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-16T20:37:01Z
dc.date.available2014-10-16T20:37:01Z
dc.date.issued2011-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/26639
dc.description.abstractNatural variability in the carbonate system is difficult to control in the lab. Furthermore, environmental carbonate chemistry data over small spatial scales is lacking. We measured discrete water samples across various flushing regimes in the San Juan Archipelago every other day during low slack tide over one neap to spring tidal transition. After analyzing these samples for temperature, salinity, total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon, we plotted these variables across space and time. Our data suggest that although carbonate chemistry varies through space and time, biological processes and tidal cycles may have a significant influence on the local marine chemistry. Our study aims to inform those interested in ocean acidification research about the natural variation of various carbonate system parameters in the San Juan Archipelago.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFriday Harbor Labsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOcean Acidification;SummerA, 2011
dc.subjectacidification, carbonate chemistry, East Sound, Haro Strait, Lab 7, San Juan Channelen_US
dc.titleCarbonate chemistry of the San Juan Archipelago: A baseline field study for future ocean acidification researchen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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