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dc.contributor.advisorPollack, Gerald Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoo, Sang Hyoken_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-24T17:31:03Z
dc.date.submitted2014en_US
dc.identifier.otherYoo_washington_0250E_12746.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/27402
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--University of Washington, 2014en_US
dc.description.abstractWater is the most abundant substance on planet Earth and present in large part of our daily lives. Despite such abundance, liquid water still remains mysterious for we do not understand its structure. Similarly, biological systems are largely composed of water and life is believed to have originated from water. However, the properties and functional role of biological water still remains an enigma. Thus, more wholesome understanding of biological water is needed to gain further purchase on workings of biological systems. The first part of this work was aimed at better understanding the properties of biological water. In biological systems, most of water is `interfacial'. Therefore, interfacial water near hydrophilic surface was characterized to model biological water. The results show that hydrophilic surfaces, including broad biological surfaces, can alter properties of nearby water extensively. These included increased viscosity, decreased kinetic energy, faster NMR spic-lattice (T1) relaxation and lower self-diffusion coefficient of water. The findings collectively indicate more ordered state of water near surfaces. In the second part of this work, water inside living muscle cells and intact myofibril was studied using molecular spectroscopy techniques. Both studies show that intracellular water within muscle has significantly stronger hydrogen bonding and hindered dynamics. In addition, changes in water properties have been correlated with muscle contraction and differentiation. Hence, water takes an active role at broad range of biological processes of varying time-scales.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.subjectCellular Water; Development; Hydrogen-bonding; IR Spectrsocopy; Muscle Contraction; NMR Spectroscopyen_US
dc.subject.otherBiophysicsen_US
dc.subject.otherBiochemistryen_US
dc.subject.otherBiomechanicsen_US
dc.subject.otherbioengineeringen_US
dc.titleBiological Water: Properties and Role in Muscle Function and Developmenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.termsDelay release for 1 year -- then make Open Accessen_US
dc.embargo.lift2016-02-24T17:31:03Z


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