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dc.contributor.advisorSharkey, Joseph Een_US
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Emily Virginiaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-11T19:58:25Z
dc.date.available2015-05-11T19:58:25Z
dc.date.submitted2015en_US
dc.identifier.otherAllen_washington_0250O_14269.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/33079
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2015en_US
dc.description.abstractThe history of women authors has been long understudied. It is only recently that feminists, historians, and literary critics have contributed to the conversation on women writers. My research adds to this conversation by focusing on historical events that altered English culture, and how these events allowed for the entrance of women into the literary profession and influenced these authors' lives and works. This is done by examining the lives and works of Aphra Behn and Anne Bradstreet, the first acknowledged professional women authors in America and England, respectively. My thesis examines primary sources, biographies, and scholarly analysis of these women's lives and works to explore the connections between the literature of Bradstreet and Behn, and the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. This comprehensive understanding of these women will show how the literature they created was not accomplished in isolation, but was the result of historical influences.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.subjectAnne Bradstreet; Aphra Behn; Literature; Queen Elizabeth I; Women's studiesen_US
dc.subject.otherHistoryen_US
dc.subject.otherComparative literatureen_US
dc.subject.otherinterdisciplinary arts and sciences - tacomaen_US
dc.titleCapitalizing on Change: The Influence of Queen Elizabeth I's Marriage Politics on the Lives and Works of Anne Bradstreet and Aphra Behnen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.termsOpen Accessen_US


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