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dc.contributor.advisorSanders, Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurwell-Chen, Aristaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-17T18:02:29Z
dc.date.available2015-07-17T18:02:29Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/33314
dc.description.abstractIn light of the Black Lives Matter movement and increasing racialized police brutality, I have encountered many friends and colleagues who feel too paralyzed to talk about racial inequality, or engage in problematic ways. The question arises: how does one speak speak out against discrimination without erasing oppressed voices? I argue that while speaking for others may contribute to erasure, it is far worse not to speak up, and there are more effective ways to be an ally. Using critical race theory and feminist theory, as well as social justice media run by Women of Color, I fashioned a theoretical toolkit to provide potential responses to common mistakes that even well-meaning allies make. Ultimately, my project seeks to interrogate colorblindness, facilitate respectful interactions when addressing systematic oppression, and encourage those in dominant social groups to venture outside spheres of privilege to engage thoughtfully in conversations with members of oppressed groups.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Washington Librariesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries2014 Libraries Undergraduate Research Award Winnersen_US
dc.titleHow to be a Good Ally: a Guide to Dismantling Colorblindness, White Normativity and Everyday Racism without Erasing Oppressed Voicesen_US
dc.typeSenior Non-Thesisen_US


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