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dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorBenjamin, Peter Y.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-29T17:55:27Z
dc.date.available2015-09-29T17:55:27Z
dc.date.submitted2015en_US
dc.identifier.otherBenjamin_washington_0250O_14660.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/33517
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2015en_US
dc.description.abstractThe body of literature surrounding the concept of social citizenship developed in the mid-20th century in order to address social inequality in Western democracies. The concept drew on human rights literature to argue that states should indeed provide a modicum of social and economic security to their citizens. Social citizenship literature has been the basis of many studies on the institutionalization of the welfare state, and some scholars have suggested that such social policies have in large part discriminated against some on the basis of race, class, gender and other social characteristics. How might we understand citizenship while recognizing the social inequality present within political and social institutions? A transformative model of citizenship must recognize that the formation of the citizen-subject is a social process. The citizen-subject is a reflection of the actions of the state and the rest of society. Although inequality is experienced by many citizens within political and social institutions, I argue that we can still identify those points at which citizenship is performed by citizen-subjects who articulate new forms of ‘being’ within their everyday lives. I further show how citizens engaged within social movements and group organizations participate in a process of becoming that reflects social citizenship. In particular, I showcase how changes in group formations develop through a politics of becoming organized in the Packinghouse Workers Organizing Committee (PWOC) of Chicago from the years 1918-1940. By participating in a politics of becoming, groups of citizens put forth new articulations of being that have an effect on our material world through group performances of social citizenship.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.subjecta politics of becoming; citizenship-social aspects; labor unions and similar organizations; United Packinghouse Workers of America; United States New Deal; 1933-1939en_US
dc.subject.otherAmerican studiesen_US
dc.subject.otherHistoryen_US
dc.subject.otherPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subject.otherinterdisciplinary arts and sciences - tacomaen_US
dc.titleThe Universal to the Material: Social Citizenship, a Politics of Becoming and New Deal Labor Organizing in Chicago Meatpackingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.termsOpen Accessen_US


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