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dc.contributor.authorOrzechowski, Emily
dc.contributor.authorSloan, Leah
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-14T23:51:46Z
dc.date.available2015-12-14T23:51:46Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/34649
dc.description.abstractThe relative rates of mortality in benthic and pelagic environments have been proposed as a major factor structuring the evolution of complex benthic invertebrate life histories. Field methods, such as tethering, have provided indispensable measurements of mortality under natural conditions for the larvae of benthic invertebrates. However, few such field studies have examined mortality rates of benthic invertebrates' early life stages in size classes less than 1 mm. Here, we tethered egg capsules to quantify how rates of predation vary with environmental gradients, especially distance from the benthic substratum and flow velocity. We found that predation is consistently high on L. scutulata egg capsules and invariant at four positions in the water column and on the benthic substratum (average 34% loss across all treatments). Instead, the flow environment had the greatest effect on predation rate. We hypothesize that higher predation in the faster flow environment was due to higher encounter rates with advected predators.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFriday Harbor Laboratoriesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLarval Biology;Summer 2014
dc.subjectLittorina scutulata, egg capsule, predation, depth, field, flow velocityen_US
dc.titleA field based assessment of predation impacts on planktonic egg capsules across depth and flow gradientsen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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