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dc.contributor.advisorMohler, Rick
dc.contributor.authorBradbury, Virginia
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-14T16:33:42Z
dc.date.available2016-07-14T16:33:42Z
dc.date.submitted2016-06
dc.identifier.otherBradbury_washington_0250O_16209.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/36401
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2016-06
dc.description.abstractDuring any given night of the year, there are more than 4500 people unsheltered, homeless in Seattle. In most cities across the US, homeless counts are declining, but not here. We have the 4th highest homeless population, and it’s only getting worse. The homeless problem is getting so out of control that the Mayor, Ed Murray, called a “State of Emergency” back in November 2015, after more than 60 people died because they lacked housing and other resources needed to survive. In Seattle, like most other cities, there are available resources for the homeless, but they are spread out across miles, making them difficult to utilize. This is where this thesis comes in. What this thesis proposes is an integration across multiple scales, which will connect the ex-homeless residents to other members of the community through programmatic and spatial overlaps within the building, an added amenity at the adjacent wetland site and connections with the neighborhood through an implemented culinary arts architecture.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectCulinary arts
dc.subjectHomeless
dc.subjectHousing
dc.subjectRainier Beach
dc.subjectSeattle
dc.subjectWetland
dc.subject.otherSocial work
dc.subject.otherLandscape architecture
dc.subject.otherarchitecture
dc.titleIntegration3
dc.typeThesis
dc.embargo.termsOpen Access


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