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dc.contributor.advisorYoung, Glennys
dc.contributor.authorBrinley, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-14T16:35:06Z
dc.date.submitted2016-06
dc.identifier.otherBrinley_washington_0250O_15735.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/36451
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2016-06
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the growth of historic preservation institutions in Soviet Moscow during the late 1960s and 70s. Beginning with the decade long creation of the General Plan of 1971 and exploring elements of professionalization, international exchanges, and citizen involvement in preservation battles, this paper complicates the narrative of emergent nationalism in Brezhnev era Moscow. Soviet preservationists worked within a bureaucratic structure that demonstrated a responsiveness to their activism, while high ranking officials, such as chief architect, Mikhail Posokhin, self-consciously cast Soviet planning and preservation practice as an alternative to Western and capitalist methods. Cases such as the rescuing of the belye palaty in Moscow’s central district demonstrate telling examples of Soviet citizenship and activism, as well as a dynamism rarely associated with “stagnation” era Soviet historiography.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectHistoric Preservation
dc.subjectMoscow
dc.subjectNationalism
dc.subjectProfessionalization
dc.subjectSoviet Citizenship
dc.subjectSoviet Union
dc.subject.otherHistory
dc.subject.otherRussian history
dc.subject.otherUrban planning
dc.subject.otherRussian, East European & Central Asian studies
dc.titlePlanning for a Communist Future: Professionalization, Nationalism, and Planning Practice in Soviet Moscow, 1964-1974
dc.typeThesis
dc.embargo.termsRestrict to UW for 1 year -- then make Open Access
dc.embargo.lift2017-07-14T16:35:06Z


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