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dc.contributor.advisorJones, Janines
dc.contributor.advisorMcCutchen, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorJacobowitz, Danielle L.
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-14T16:39:53Z
dc.date.available2016-07-14T16:39:53Z
dc.date.submitted2016-06
dc.identifier.otherJacobowitz_washington_0250O_15807.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/36569
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2016-06
dc.description.abstractAfrican-Americans historically have learned dance through observation, participation, and social/community ties. This is the very definition of situated learning. Lindy hop and blues dance are two social dances which were created by and for African-Americans. Lindy hop and blues dance instructors and organizers have codified and commodified these historical African-American social dances, which has affected the composition of the community of learners, thus creating cultural erasure and placing undue focus on the preservation, and not the evolution, of these dances. Adopting pieces of an art that is historically linked to a culture without understanding the depth of that link is a kind of cultural appropriation. Cultural appropriation goes beyond offending people; it continues patterns of disempowering groups of people who are already marginalized. Cultural appropriation is a common problem in African-American history, and dance is no exception (Young, 2010).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectAfrican American
dc.subjectblues dance
dc.subjectcommodification
dc.subjectcultural appropriation
dc.subjectlindy hop
dc.subject.otherAfrican American studies
dc.subject.otherEducation
dc.subject.otherDance
dc.subject.othereducation - seattle
dc.titleThe Commodification and Appropriation of African-American Vernacular Dances
dc.typeThesis
dc.embargo.termsOpen Access


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