The carbon cycle of Glacier Bay, Alaska: primary productivity, the importance of terrestrial inputs and the air-sea carbon dioxide exchange

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The carbon cycle of Glacier Bay, Alaska: primary productivity, the importance of terrestrial inputs and the air-sea carbon dioxide exchange

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dc.contributor.author Clos, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned 2008-07-22T22:56:29Z
dc.date.available 2008-07-22T22:56:29Z
dc.date.issued 2008-06-19
dc.identifier.citation Keil R., Kelley D., D'Asaro E., Krembs C., and Collins R.E. [Eds.] 2008. Proceedings from the University of Washington School of Oceanography Undergraduate Thesis Research Expedition to Glacier Bay Alaska, March 2008. 296pp. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1773/3758
dc.description.abstract The study examined dissolved organic carbon, alkalinity, particulate organic carbon, and wind speed over the period of a few days. Gas exchange between the atmosphere and ocean is eight times higher than over the open ocean, although comparable to the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. Strong mixing with waters outside Glacier Bay was indicated by two measurements: a low value of respired carbon dioxide and a low value of terrestrial organic carbon. A year-long time series is recommended to obtain a good base level measurement of the carbon cycle in the bay. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher School of Oceanography, University of Washington en
dc.subject Carbon cycle (Biogeochemistry)--Alaska--Glacier Bay en
dc.subject Chemical oceanography en
dc.subject Carbon dioxide--measurement en
dc.title The carbon cycle of Glacier Bay, Alaska: primary productivity, the importance of terrestrial inputs and the air-sea carbon dioxide exchange en
dc.type Other en


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