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dc.contributor.authorTennis, Joseph T.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-19T22:30:04Z
dc.date.available2017-01-19T22:30:04Z
dc.date.created2010
dc.identifier.citationTennis, J. T. (2010). "Form, Intention, and Indexing: The Liminal and Integrated Conceptions of Work in Knowledge Organization." In Advances in Classification Research. Vol. 21.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/37983
dc.description.abstractThis paper proposes a dual conception of work in knowledge organization. The first part is a conception of work as liminal, set apart from everyday work. The second is integrated, without separation. This talk is the beginning of a larger project where we will characterize work in knowledge organization, both as it is set out in our literature (Šauperl, 2004; Hjørland 2003 Wilson, 1968), and in a philosophical argument for its fundamental importance in the activities of society (Shera, 1972; Zandonade, 2004).But in order to do this, we will co-opt the conception of liminality from the anthropology of religion (Turner, 1967), and Zen Buddhist conceptions of moral action, intention, and integration (Harvey, 2000 and cf., Harada, S., 2008).The goal for this talk is to identify the acts repeated (form) and the purpose of those acts (intention), in knowledge organization, with specific regard to thresholds (liminal points) of intention present in those acts.We can then ask the questions: Where is intention in knowledge organization liminal and where is it integrated? What are the limits of knowledge organization work when considered at a foundational level of the intention labor practices? Answering such questions, in this context, allows us to reconsider the assumptions we have about knowledge organization work and its increasingly important role in society. As a consequence, we can consider the limits of classification research if we see the foundations of knowledge organization work when we see forms and intentions. I must also say that incorporating Zen Buddhist philosophy into knowledge organization research seems like it fits well with ethics and ethical responses the practice of knowledge organization. This is because 20th Century Western interpretations of Zen are often rooted in ethical considerations. This translates easily to work.
dc.format.mimetypepdf
dc.publisherAdvances in Classification Research
dc.titleForm, Intention, and Indexing: The Liminal and Integrated Conceptions of Work in Knowledge Organization
dc.typeArticle


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