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dc.contributor.advisorPena, Robert
dc.contributor.authorVanwestrienen, Nile
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-14T22:34:41Z
dc.date.available2017-02-14T22:34:41Z
dc.date.submitted2016-12
dc.identifier.otherVanwestrienen_washington_0250O_16720.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/38025
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2016-12
dc.description.abstractCurrently, the scale and speed of human progress is disproportionate to live sustainably within the environment. This type of progress has forced us to choose between the continuation of human excess or the balance and rekindling between the human and natural world. Through an exploration into the ways that our environment affects our perspective and understanding, as well as the nature of children and their developmental needs, this thesis emphasizes the important role children play in reconnecting us to nature. Architecturally, this thesis explores a methodology to elementary school design. These places for learning are supposed to provide the foundation to our children’s understanding of the world. Included in the methodology is a systems-based approach to architectural design, a pedagogy in experiential education and Ecoliteracy, and an alignment to fit the culture of each community. With this framework for design, our future generations will be able to reclaim their connection to nature.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsnone
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.subjectEcoliteracy
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectPermaculture
dc.subjectReggio-Emilia
dc.subjectSustainability
dc.subject.otherArchitecture
dc.subject.otherEducation
dc.subject.otherAgriculture
dc.subject.otherarchitecture
dc.titleDynamic Balance_school as living system
dc.typeThesis
dc.embargo.termsOpen Access


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