Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCummings, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorCosta, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-14T22:38:39Z
dc.date.submitted2016-12
dc.identifier.otherCosta_washington_0250E_16703.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/38121
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--University of Washington, 2016-12
dc.description.abstractThe presence of freaks in American literary texts, particularly as they re-emerge in late 20th century works, articulate a complex set of relationships that define what Elizabeth Grosz calls “acceptable, tolerable, knowable humanity” played out by audiences and actors on a national stage (55). This dissertation investigates the freak as a figure of critical potential for both reclamation and appropriation through feminist, queer, and disability studies lenses. It tracks the shifting relationships between “freaks” and U.S. national culture, illustrating how the freak serves as a powerful figure that disrupts binary logics and expands the knowable limits of public life. However, it also recognizes that the power of the freak is double-edged, illustrating how the resurgence of freak shows in the postmodern cultural landscape has also enabled the appropriation of freakishness by “norms” through the same powerful logics of exceptional individualism and diverse pluralism that configure the freak show as a “freaktopia.”
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsnone
dc.subjectamerican literature
dc.subjectdisability
dc.subjectfeminist
dc.subjectfreaks
dc.subjectfreakshow
dc.subjectqueer
dc.subject.otherEnglish literature
dc.subject.otherLiterature
dc.subject.otherPerforming arts
dc.subject.otherenglish
dc.titleFreaks in Public: Reading the Freakish in Contemporary American Literature and Culture
dc.typeThesis
dc.embargo.termsRestrict to UW for 5 years -- then make Open Access
dc.embargo.lift2022-01-19T22:38:39Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record