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dc.contributor.advisorWellman, James K
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Stephen Randolph
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-11T22:46:12Z
dc.date.submitted2017-06
dc.identifier.otherThompson_washington_0250E_17426.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/39869
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--University of Washington, 2017-06
dc.description.abstractAfter 70 years of battle against Communists, genocidal leaders, and Islamists, the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) has laid down the sword of righteous American interventionism in the name of liberty. The SBC’s loss of faith in the United States’ ability to nation-build resulted primarily from the persecution of Christians by Islamist terrorists. This persecution began in the first year of OIF and reached its apex during the Islamic State’s campaign of genocide following the U.S. withdrawal. Due to the Baptists’ own heritage of persecution, they viewed this outcome as devastatingly tragic, and a generation of Southern Baptists learned to distrust the ability of any government to avoid tragic failures in its efforts to impose its ideals abroad. In the end, the SBC incorporated this lesson into its Just War theology and then opposed interventions that would require a nation-building effort like the one that failed in Iraq.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsnone
dc.subjectIraq
dc.subjectnation-building
dc.subjectprotestantism
dc.subjectreligion
dc.subjectsouthern baptist
dc.subjectwar
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectReligious history
dc.subjectAmerican studies
dc.subject.otherInternational studies.
dc.titleThe Exodus from Iraq and the end of Christian Nation-building
dc.typeThesis
dc.embargo.termsDelay release for 1 year -- then make Open Access
dc.embargo.lift2018-08-11T22:46:12Z


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