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dc.contributor.advisorJones, Christopher D
dc.contributor.authorHalfhill, Dana Louise
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-11T22:46:21Z
dc.date.submitted2017-06
dc.identifier.otherHalfhill_washington_0250O_17404.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/39891
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2017-06
dc.description.abstractBuddhism is officially one of the four traditional religions of Russia, along with Russian Orthodoxy, Judaism, and Islam. Buddhism can be found being practiced all over Russia, but it is primarily in the three autonomous republics of Buryatia, Kalmykia, Tuva. While all three regions have been successfully rebuilding temples and opening Buddhist organizations, there are a number of issues from drunken monks in Buryatia to a peaceful but complicated relationship with Tuvan Shamanism. Along with this, these three Buddhist movements have evolved differently over time. The intention of this thesis is to understand why these different trajectories have occurred and how they influence the socio-political climate in these regions. I argue that the main reasons for these different trajectories are historical and cultural in nature in that they have occurred primarily as a result of the treatment they received under the Soviet Union.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsnone
dc.subjectBuddhism
dc.subjectBuryatia
dc.subjectKalmykia
dc.subjectPost-Soviet
dc.subjectRussian Federation
dc.subjectTuva
dc.subjectPolitical science
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subject.otherRussian, East European & Central Asian studies
dc.titleMapping the Buddhist Lands of Russia: Understanding the Post-Soviet Sangha and Its Political Connections
dc.typeThesis
dc.embargo.termsRestrict to UW for 1 year -- then make Open Access
dc.embargo.lift2018-08-11T22:46:21Z


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