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dc.contributor.advisorMeishcke, Hendrika W
dc.contributor.advisorPainter, Ian S
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Barry Richard
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-26T20:45:07Z
dc.date.available2017-10-26T20:45:07Z
dc.date.submitted2017-08
dc.identifier.otherMorrison_washington_0250O_17852.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/40414
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2017-08
dc.description.abstractAbstract Purpose: The purpose of this thesis paper is to analyze if there is a dose-response effect of a simulation training of 9-1-1 operators on improved recognition and timing of the need for telephone-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). T-CPR is an important tool for 9-1-1 operators, as cardiac arrest survival rates have been shown to improve, when T-CPR is provided without delay. The ability to timely recognize and therefore initiate T-CPR protocols is critical in sudden cardiac arrest events. Methods/Design: Analysis was conducted on dispatchers from thirteen call centers who were randomized to receive mock caller scenarios, as part of a randomized controlled study of the use of simulation for training 9-1-1 operators in recognition of cardiac arrest. The simulation consisted on an actor acting in the capacity of a 9-1-1 caller, calling in with a simulated scenario, with the 9-1-1 dispatcher reacting per their protocols for a cardiac event. Each 9-1-1 dispatcher was subject to 4 sessions, with 3 training calls each, and received a brief feedback after the session was over from an instructor who listened in on the calls. All participants’ sessions were recorded and abstracted for time to start of call to recognition of the need for T-CPR, and appropriate inquiry of consciousness and breathing status of the patient. Analysis: The analysis focuses on whether or not the training simulations indicated if the dispatchers improved as they progressed through the training sessions. Mixed effects linear regressions were used with fixed effects for the main variables. A separate, secondary analysis was conducted to compare rates of recognition between those dispatchers with < 2 years of experience, and dispatchers with > 2 years of experience. Results: The does-response analysis indicated a statistically significant effect, in that the more trainings received: 1) recognition of cardiac arrest, and 2) time to start CPR instructions decreased. However, when looking at the effect of years of experience, there was no statistically significant result. Discussion: This thesis paper illustrated that as the number of simulated training increases, dispatcher’s time to recognize the need for T-CPR instructions decreases, which can lead to the start of T-CPR sooner. 9-1-1 dispatch call centers should look at incorporating simulated training into their operations. Recognition of the need for T-CPR in sudden cardiac arrest events, is critical to achieving positive outcomes.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsnone
dc.subjectCardiac arrest
dc.subjectCPR
dc.subjectDispatcher
dc.subjectSimulation
dc.subjectT-CPR
dc.subjectTraining
dc.subjectPublic health education
dc.subject.otherGlobal Health
dc.titleDoes Simulation Training Increase 9-1-1 Operator’s Ability to Recognize the Need for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Instruction?
dc.typeThesis
dc.embargo.termsOpen Access


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