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dc.contributor.advisorSearle, Leroy
dc.contributor.authorTavlin, Zachary
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-31T21:11:50Z
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.otherTavlin_washington_0250E_18592.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/42307
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--University of Washington, 2018
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation challenges the longstanding assumption that visuality in American literature of the nineteenth century through early modernism was inherently imperialistic, possessive, and theological. I acknowledge the critical force of readings that impose unified narratives of the “American eye” as an epistemological tool for clearing the wilderness, generating a representative national subject, and ushering in a Puritanical millennium by “fore-seeing” the completion of Western civilization and culture in America. But I show that critiques of the possessive “gaze” were already developing in the literature of the period by writers (Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, Henry James) exposed to contemporaneous developments in visual art and technology. Each chapter traces a tension in these writers’ works between imperial gazes and subtle glances, specifically as they adapt their writing practices over time to account for new visual subjectivities—embodied, relational, and open to change—generated by early photography and motion picture studies, experiments in Impressionism, new techniques in the art of portraiture, and the dawn of cinema.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsnone
dc.subjectAmerican literature
dc.subjectgaze
dc.subjectglance
dc.subjectmodernism
dc.subjectnineteenth century
dc.subjectvisual culture
dc.subjectAmerican literature
dc.subjectArt history
dc.subjectPhilosophy
dc.subject.otherEnglish
dc.titleGlancing Visions: American Literature Beyond the Gaze
dc.typeThesis
dc.embargo.termsRestrict to UW for 5 years -- then make Open Access
dc.embargo.lift2023-07-05T21:11:50Z


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