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dc.contributor.authorKovenock, Marlies
dc.contributor.authorSwann, Abigail L.S.
dc.contributor.authorKoven, Charles D.
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Rosie A.
dc.contributor.authorKnox, Ryan G.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-14T21:20:06Z
dc.date.available2020-08-14T21:20:06Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/46218
dc.descriptionThis archive contains data in support of Kovenock et al. 2020. See README for description of the data files.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe response of tropical ecosystems to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) remains a critical uncertainty in projections of future climate. Here we investigate how leaf trait plasticity in response to elevated CO2 alters projections of tropical forest competitive dynamics and functioning. We use demographic vegetation model simulations to quantify how plasticity in leaf mass per area and leaf carbon to nitrogen ratio alter the responses of carbon uptake, evapotranspiration, and competitive ability to a doubling of CO2 in a tropical forest. Observationally constrained leaf trait plasticity in response to CO2 fertilization reduces the degree to which tropical tree carbon uptake is affected by a doubling of CO2 (up to -14.7% as compared to a case with no plasticity; 95% confidence interval CI95% -14.4 to -15.0). It further diminishes evapotranspiration (up to -7.0%, CI95% -6.4 to -7.7), and lowers competitive ability in our simulations. Consideration of leaf trait plasticity to elevated CO2 lowers tropical ecosystem carbon uptake and evapotranspirative cooling in the absence of changes in plant type abundance. However, ‘plastic’ responses to high CO2 which maintain higher levels of plant productivity are potentially more competitively advantageous, thus, including changes in plant type abundance may mitigate these decreases in ecosystem functioning. Models that explicitly represent competition between plants with alternative leaf trait plasticity in response to elevated CO2 are needed to capture these influences on tropical forest functioning and large-scale climate.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation AGS-1553715 to the University of Washington. All simulations were run on the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Cheyenne system. High-performance computing support from Cheyenne (doi:10.5065/D6RX99HX) was provided by NCAR's Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, sponsored by the National Science Foundation.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES::Biology::Terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecology::Terrestrial ecologyen_US
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES::Earth sciences::Atmosphere and hydrosphere sciences::Climatologyen_US
dc.titleModel simulation output in support of "Leaf trait plasticity alters competitive ability and functioning of simulated tropical trees in response to elevated carbon dioxide"en_US
dc.typeDataseten_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States