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dc.contributor.authorThomas, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-19T22:03:32Z
dc.date.available2022-04-19T22:03:32Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/48387
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the effects of microplastics (MPs) on the growth of marine bacteria in the open ocean to try to obtain a general picture on whether or not bacteria can be harmed by or benefit from the presence of MPs in their environment. Samples of were collected in the vicinity of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP), just outside the Hawaiian islands, and just outside the California coast. The bacteria were grown in the presence of Teflon, polycarbonate, and polypropylene filters as well as a control sample with no filter. Generally, plastics enhanced the growth of bacteria compared to the control samples and the highest hourly growth rate was experienced by a sample with polypropylene, being 1.59*10^4 bacteria per hour. One control and one Teflon sample, each at a different station, experienced a loss of bacteria. There are still many unanswered questions about the relationship between MPs and bacterial growth, namely which species benefit from MP accompaniment and which species are potentially beneficial to the oceanen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOcean 445;
dc.subjectMicroplasticsen_US
dc.subjectMarine bacteriaen_US
dc.subjectGreat Pacific Garbage Patchen_US
dc.subjectPacific Oceanen_US
dc.titleMarine Bacterial Growth Rates in the Presence of Microplasticsen_US


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