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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Michelleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-06T15:22:25Z
dc.date.available2009-10-06T15:22:25Z
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.otherb37095080en_US
dc.identifier.other36435539en_US
dc.identifier.otherThesis 45019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/6168
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 1996en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the late 1980s and 1990s, individuals in the intellectual and academic circles of the journalistic community argued over whether or not journalists should publish the names of crime victims, particularly rape victims, in news stories. This dissertation examines journalists' practices in naming crime victims, their legal right to name victims, and their ethical justifications for naming victims. It finds that journalists actually name few crime victims in the news, although the First Amendment gives them nearly an absolute right to do so. Journalists' ethical justifications for naming crime victims vary greatly. Some journalists give a great deal of thought to their actions; some give little. Generally, journalists demonstrate good intentions but a lack of understanding of the potential consequences of their actions.en_US
dc.format.extentvi, 217 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.rights.urien_US
dc.subject.otherTheses--Communicationsen_US
dc.titleUsing crime victims' names in the news: journalists' legal rights and ethical justificationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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