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dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Daniel Paulen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-06T22:41:33Z
dc.date.available2009-10-06T22:41:33Z
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.identifier.otherb15331854en_US
dc.identifier.other10953086en_US
dc.identifier.otheren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/8858
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 1984en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this dissertation is to improve upon the ecological analysis of deviance by proposing and testing a more theoretically based ecology of deviance. The ecological analysis of crime and other deviant behaviors has a long history and spans several academic disciplines. However, there are many problems in this literature most of which can be traced to the lack of a strong theoretical grounding.A community control perspective is put forth in an effort to address many of these problems. This perspective has theoretical roots in the work of Durkheim, the social disorganization theorists of the Chicago School, and in modern social control theory.Several important ideas are drawn from Durkheim: the vital role of the community as the source of social control; the importance of social integration; and the unique integrative role of religious affiliation. The importance of population instability as a force disruptive to community integration was a major theme of the Chicago sociologists. Finally, the notion of social bonding is extracted from modern control theory and applied to the ecological level of analysis.The perspective says that factors in a community that encourage bonding among community members increase the social integration of the community and results in lower rates of deviance. Religious affiliation and population stability are examples of the kinds of factors that facilitate bonding. It is hypothesized that these kinds of factors will operate best on forms of deviance that are primarily intentional rather than impulsive in nature.The perspective is tested using data on crime in Canadian towns and cities of a population of 10,000 or more (n = 218). The community control perspective is contrasted with alternative explanations. The empirical analysis provides substantial evidence of the efficacy of this approach.en_US
dc.format.extent207 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.rights.uriFor information on access and permissions, please see http://digital.lib.washington.edu/rw-faq/rights.htmlen_US
dc.subject.otherTheses--Sociologyen_US
dc.titleCommunity control and crime: an ecological analysisen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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