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dc.contributor.authorWall, Thomas Carl, 1954-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-06T23:26:28Z
dc.date.available2009-10-06T23:26:28Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.otherb34877162en_US
dc.identifier.other33295107en_US
dc.identifier.otheren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/9350
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 1995en_US
dc.description.abstractIn general, our study is an attempt to communicate with recent work on mimesis, differance, and affect in the belief that this work has radicalized and generalized the concept of communication and, hence, of community (politics, ethics, and art). We will observe, as our most consistent point of reference, that the very term 'artwork' has come to be oxymoronic. Yet the term is still the obscure memory of a profoundly unaccomplished time that particular works of art freeze into an icon. That is to say, the work of art retains an untimeliness too young to be yet thinkable, or so purely diachronic as to be always already no longer thinkable. What is more, art is "able" to communicate this untimeliness. That works of art exist at all is, in this study, evidence of a communication irreducible to cognition.Beginning with Emmanuel Levinas's description of art as reality's "shadow," or "allegory," we attempt to think the artwork as an ontological enigma. In our third chapter we will pursue the paradoxical logic that attaches to that which has no self as it speaks even more enigmatically in the writings of Maurice Blanchot for whom language in general is withdrawn from power into a pure potentia, or "profound depth." This characteristic--no identity--is also a Levinasian theme and we wish to show, in our second chapter, that his ethical language both is and is not "equal" to a rapport (without rapport) with that which escapes identity (without escaping). In short, we will conclude that there is no autrement qu'etre but we will notice the outlines of an infinite delay or an empty totality that does and does not hearken to the call of Being. With this in mind we will turn to Giorgio Agamben for whom "being-in-language" is the very other experience of time hitherto attested in the stupefied immobility of the icon. To make this argument, we will rejoin Kant's obsession with the transcendental apperceptor and we will ask, simply: Who is there?en_US
dc.format.extentii, 257 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the individual authors.en_US
dc.rights.urien_US
dc.subject.otherTheses--Englishen_US
dc.titleThe caress of futurity: a study of the ontological status of art and language in the works of Levinas, Blanchot, and Agambenen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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