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dc.contributor.authorJones, William
dc.contributor.authorPhuwanartnurak, Ammy Jiranida
dc.contributor.authorGill, Rajdeep
dc.contributor.authorBruce, Harry
dc.date.accessioned2005-01-11T16:08:49Z
dc.date.available2005-01-11T16:08:49Z
dc.date.issued2005-01-11T16:08:49Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1773/2031
dc.descriptionWilliam Jones, Ammy Jiranida Phuwanartnurak, Rajdeep Gill & Harry Bruce, Don’t Take My Folders Away! Organizing Personal Information to Get Things Done, Technical Report IS-TR-2005-01-01, Information School, University of Washington, January 11, 2005.en
dc.description.abstractA study explores the way people organize information in support of projects (“teach a course”, “plan a wedding”, etc.). The folder structures to organize project information – especially electronic documents and other files – frequently resembled a “divide and conquer” problem decomposition with subfolders corresponding to major components (subprojects) of the project. Folders were clearly more than simply a means to one end: Organizing for later retrieval. Folders were information in their own right – representing, for example, a person’s evolving understanding of a project and its components. Unfortunately, folders are often “overloaded” with information. For example, folders sometimes included leading characters to force an ordering (“aa”, “zz”). And folder hierarchies frequently reflected a tension between organizing information for current use vs. repeated re-use.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation, Information & Data Management Programen
dc.format.extent237774 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical Report;IS-TR-2005-01-01
dc.subjectPersonal Information Managementen
dc.subjectHuman Problem Solvingen
dc.titleDon’t Take My Folders Away! Organizing Personal Information to Get Things Doneen
dc.typeArticleen


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