Ocean acidification and disease: How will a changing climate impact <italic>Vibrio tubiashii</italic> growth and pathogenicity to Pacific oyster larvae?

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Ocean acidification and disease: How will a changing climate impact <italic>Vibrio tubiashii</italic> growth and pathogenicity to Pacific oyster larvae?

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Title: Ocean acidification and disease: How will a changing climate impact <italic>Vibrio tubiashii</italic> growth and pathogenicity to Pacific oyster larvae?
Author: Dorfmeier, Elene
Abstract: <italic>Vibrio tubiashii</italic> (Vt) is a causative agent of vibriosis in molluscan bivalves. Recent re-emergence of vibriosis in economically valuable shellfish, such as the Pacific oyster (<italic>Crassostrea gigas</italic>) in Washington State, has increased the urgency to understand the ecology of this pathogen. It is currently unknown how predicted environmental changes associated with ocean acidification, such as elevated surface seawater temperature, increased partial pressure of CO<sub>2</sub> (pCO<sub>2</sub>), and Vt abundance will impact marine organismal health and disease susceptibility. This study investigates how environmental cues predicted with ocean acidification influence physiological changes and pathogenicity in Vt. Using laboratory experiments to manipulate temperature and pCO<sub>2</sub>, we examined how these environmental factors influenced pathogen growth. Larval susceptibility to vibriosis was determined by exposing <italic>C. gigas</italic> larvae to a combination of elevated pCO<sub>2</sub> and Vt concentrations. These experiments provide insight into the environmental parameters that may drive pathogenicity or influence proliferation of the bacterium. Investigation of single and multivariate parameters such as temperature, pCO<sub>2</sub>, and pathogen levels will help assess how predicted shifts in ocean conditions can impact shellfish survival and disease resistance.
Description: Thesis (Master's)--University of Washington, 2012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/20742
Author requested restriction: No embargo

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